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LITERATURE

- written works, especially those considered of


superior or lasting artistic merit.

- writings in which expression and form, in


connection with ideas of permanent and universal
interest, are characteristic or essential features, as
poetry, novels, history, biography, and essays.
Figurative Language
Figurative Language
– is a linguistic device
that makes a language
more colorful or livelier.
Types of figurative
language
Simile
-a comparison using the
word “like” or “as.”

Her eyes were like


emeralds.
Simile
-a comparison using the
word “like” or “as.”

Her eyes were like


emeralds.
Metaphor
*This coffee shop is an ice
box!

*All the world's a stage


Metaphor
-a comparison saying one
thing is another thing.

Her face a flower.


Personification
-giving human qualities to
an object, animal, or idea.
The angry sea swallowed up
the tiny boat.
Personification
Opportunity knocked at his door.
The sun greeted me this morning.
The sky was full of dancing stars.
The radio suddenly stopped singing
and stared at me.
Hyperbole
-an exaggeration used
to make a point.
My backpack weighed
a ton.
Hyperbole
I’ve told you a million times
to clean your room!
Her head was spinning from
all the new information.
Hyperbole
I have a million problems.
We won a tonne of cash.
I'll die if I don't finish this
crossword.
Anaphora
The deliberate repetition of a word or phrase at
the beginning of several successive verses,
clauses, or paragraphs;

"We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on


the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields
and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills"
Anaphora
Unfortunately, I was in the wrong
place at the wrong time on the
wrong day.
Euphemism
An expression intended by the speaker to be
less offensive, disturbing, or troubling to the
listener than the word or phrase it replaces:
"Euphemisms such as passed away' instead of died. . .
She is plain instead of ugly.
Onomatopoeia
Employs a word, or occasionally, a
grouping of words, that imitates,
echoes, or suggests the object it is
describing, such as "bang", "click", "fizz",
"hush" or "buzz", or animal noises such
as "moo", "quack" or "meow".
Oxymoron
A figure of speech in which incongruous
or contradictory terms appear side by
side.
"We picked a bad year to have a good
year.“
Alliteration
When two or more words in a
poem begin with the same
letter or sound.
Rain races, Ripping like wind. Its
restless rage Rattles like Rocks
ripping through the air.
Chiasmus
-is the figure of speech in which two or more
clauses are related to each other through a
reversal of structure.
Oh, you haven't, haven't you?“

The famous chef said people should


live to eat, not eat to live.
Irony
-is the figure of speech in which words are used
in such a way that their intended meaning is
different from the actual meaning of the words.

I posted a video on YouTube about how boring


and useless YouTube is.
The name of Britain’s biggest dog was “Tiny”.
Assonance
- similarity in sound between
vowels in neighboring words.
“The cat sat on a mat.”
How now, brown cow?
Synecdoche
The use of a part
to represent the
whole.
Synecdoche
When they got
married, they
decided to live in one
roof.
Metonymy
- means substitution.
The pen is mightier than the
sword.
(Pen refers to written words,
and sword to military force.)
Metonymy vs. Synecdoche
I will ask your father for your
hand in marriage. (Synecdoche)
Let me give you a hand.
(Metonymy)
Anti-thesis
- the direct opposite.
Man proposes, God disposes.
Love is an ideal thing, marriage
a real thing.
Speech is silver, but silence is gold.
Patience is bitter, but it has a sweet fruit.
Money is the root of all evil: poverty is the
fruit of all goodness.
You are easy on the eyes, but hard on
the heart.
Apostrophe
-it is used when you address a dead
person or an inanimate object.

“Ninoy, wake up!”

"Oh, you stupid car, you never work when


I need you to," Bert sighed.
Practice Time

See if you can correctly


identify the following types
of figurative language.
What kind of figurative language is this?

My stomach growled.
Personification

The sentence gives a


stomach human qualities
(growling).
What kind of figurative
language is this?

Bob was so scared he


turned white as a ghost.
Simile

The sentence compares


Bob to a ghost using the
word “as.”
What kind of figurative
language is this?

She nearly died


laughing.
Hyperbole

The sentence exaggerates


to prove a point (she
didn’t really almost die).
What kind of figurative
language is this?

1. We have to let you go.


2. You’re well fed.
Euphemism
The sentence compares
two things by saying my
stomach is a bottomless
pit.
What kind of figurative
language is this?

My stomach is a
bottomless pit.
Metaphor

The sentence compares two


things by saying my stomach is
a bottomless pit.
What kind of figurative
language is this?

This couch is as hard as a


rock.
Simile

The sentence compares


the couch to a rock using
the word “as.”
What kind of figurative
language is this?
I’m not afraid to die, I’m not
afraid to live, I’m not afraid to
love, I’m not afraid to be alone.
Anaphora
What kind of figurative
language is this?

I’m so hungry I could


eat a horse.
Hyperbole

The sentence exaggerates to


prove a point (I couldn’t really
eat a horse).
What kind of figurative
language is this?

Mary is an angel.
Metaphor

The sentence compares


two things by saying
Mary is an angel.
What kind of figurative
language is this?

Your dog is so ugly, we have


to pay the fleas to live on him.
Hyperbole
What kind of figurative
language is this?

The two large oak trees


guarded the path.
Personification

The sentence gives the


trees human qualities
(guarding the path).
What kind of figurative
language is this?

The cabin was a freezer


during the winter.
Metaphor

The sentence compares


two things by saying the
cabin was a freezer.
What kind of figurative
language is this?

The wind howled through


the trees.
Personification

The sentence gives the


wind human qualities
(howled).
What kind of figurative
language is this?

I tried calling him a million


times.
Hyperbole

The sentence exaggerates to


prove a point (I didn’t really
call a million times).
What kind of figurative
language is this?

Jason ran like a cheetah.


Simile

The sentence compares Jason


to a cheetah using the word
“like.”
What kind of figurative
language is this?

That poem really spoke to


me.
Personification

The sentence gives the poem


human qualities (the poem
speaking).
What kind of figurative
language is this?

The test was a piece of


cake.
Metaphor

The sentence compares


two things by saying the
test was a piece of cake.
What kind of figurative
language is this?
Her hair flowed over her
shoulders like a golden river.
Simile

The sentence compares


her hair to a golden river
using the word “like.”
What kind of figurative
language is this?

“I’ve been waiting forever!”


she exclaimed.
Hyperbole

The sentence exaggerates to


prove a point (she didn’t really
wait forever).
Litotes
It is a figure of speech in which a positive is stated by
negating its opposite.

She's not the brightest girl in the class. (She's stupid!)


He's not the most handsome fellow! (he's ugly!)
the end….

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