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Written and Illustrated

by Phillip Martin
The Stone Age

The Stone
Age is the
period of
human
history before
the Bronze
Age and the
Iron Age.
The Stone Age

The Stone Age gets its


name from stones.
But why?
It is the age when
early humans first
started using stones
for their tools and
weapons. This was a
game changer helping them
hunt, build and make their lives easier.
The Stone Age

Archaeologists study artifacts to determine


when and where the Stone Age started.
Not all places on the planet
had development at
the same time so dates
vary. But, people
started using tools
about two million
years ago.
The Stone Age

Archaeologists divide the Stone Age into three


periods, depending on the sophistication of the
tools used.
The three periods are
the Paleolithic Age
(Old Stone Age), the
Mesolithic Age (Middle
Stone Age) and the
Neolithic Age (New
Stone Age).
The Stone Age

The Paleolithic Age


(Old Stone Age) took
place during the last
ice age.
It may come as a
surprise to learn, the
Paleolithic Age lasted
so long it accounts for
99% of all human
history!
The Stone Age

In the Paleolithic Age, tools


were also made from wood
and bone.
Languages developed and
people even began to express
themselves
with art on
the walls of caves.
The Stone Age

The Mesolithic
Age (Middle
Stone Age) was
the period of
time between the
ice age and the
introduction of
farming.
The Stone Age

During the Mesolithic Age,


weapons were more refined
and smaller. This included
arrows and spears.
Man’s best friend,
the faithful dog, was
domesticated at this
time from wolves!
The Stone Age

The Neolithic Age


(New Stone Age) was
the time between the
start of farming and
the beginning of the
Bronze Age.
By this time, people
also had cows and
sheep.
The Stone Age

Farming permitted
people to stay in one
location instead of
constantly moving in
search of food.
Communities grew,
different roles in the
community developed
and trade connected
people to other parts
of the world.
The Stone Age

North
America
Europe

Asia

Africa

South
America
Australia

Earliest human findings are in Africa. From there,


early humans migrated into Europe and Asia before
they continued on to the rest of the world.
The Stone Age
The Bronze Age
The Iron Age

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