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Computers or Workstations
The most obvious requirements for a network
are a number of computers or workstations.

We now need some means of physically


connecting them.
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Cabling
You must have some means of physically
connecting them together.
The type of cable you use to connect the computers
together will very much depend on your needs.
Network¶s Topology
Protocol
Size
Poor low quality cabling can result in poor data
Transmission; causing data to become corrupted.
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Types of Cabling
Coaxial

Coaxial cabling has a single copper conductor in its


center. A plastic layer provides insulation between
the center conductor and a braided metal shield.
The metal shield helps to block outside interference.
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Types of Cabling
Coaxial
There are two types of coaxial cabling:
Thin coaxial also known as 10Base2
Thick coaxial also known as 10Base5
2 = maximum length 200Mtrs (185)
5 = maximum length 500Mtrs

Coaxial cabling is often used on the linear Bus


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Types of Cabling
Twisted Pair

Twisted Pair cabling comes in two varieties; shielded


and unshielded. UTP is the most popular.
The cable has four pairs of wires inside the jacket
twisted to eliminate interference from adjacent pairs
and other electrical devices.
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Types of Cabling
Twisted Pair
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Types of Cabling
Twisted Pair
10BaseT refers to the specifications for UTP.
100Mtrs maximum segment length.

Shielded twisted pair (STP) is suitable for


environments with electrical interference; however
the extra shielding can make it quite bulky.
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Types of Cabling
Fiber Optic Cable

Fiber optic cabling consists of a center glass core


surrounded by several layers of protective materials.

It transfers light rather than electronic signals,


Eliminating the problem of electrical interference.
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Types of Cabling
Fiber optic cabling
Fiber optic has the ability to transmit signals over
much longer distances than coaxial or twisted pair.
It also has the capability to carry information at
vastly greater speeds.

10BaseF or 100BaseFX refers to the specifications


for fiber optic cable.
Types of Cabling
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Cable Terms
   
   

T = Twisted Pair
Usually Baseband (wire)
2 = Thin Coax
10 or 100 Or
5 = Thick Coax
Broadband (wireless)
FX = Fiber

Examples: 10-Base-T
100-Base-FX
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Network Card

To allow our workstations to communicate with each


other we must fit each computer with a network
card ± These are known as Network Interface Cards.
they are fitted into an expansion slot.
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„epeater
When a signal travels along a cable, it tends to lose
strength.

A repeater is a device that boosts a network¶s signal


as it passes through.

The repeater does this by electronically amplifying


the signal.
„outer
A „outer is a special device which can be fitted to
Connect and „oute Local Area network
To Larger Network ( WAN ).
The „outer „oute data to pass between networks,
it processes packets of data containing details of
the sending and receiving computers.

It will direct traffic on a suitable route to reach its


destination.
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File Server

A file server stands at the heart of most networks.


It is a very fast computer with a large amount of
„AM.
The network operating system resides on this
computer, along with any application and data files
that need to be shared.
File Server
The file server controls the communication of
information between the nodes on a network

Its main function is to store files being used by


other computers, it allows them to access shared
files.

To stop nodes accessing the same file at the same


time, a file server uses µFile Locking¶
Printer Server
The purpose of a printer server is to accept print
requests from nodes on the network and place them
in a queue.

There is a buffer area which can hold data from


various nodes. As one print job is complete, the
next job in the queue is processed.

It is possible to set some computers to have priority


over others.
Client

All the computers connected to a server on a network


are called clients or workstations.
A typical client is a computer that is configured with
a NIC, client software and the appropriate cabling.
Almost any computer can serve as a network client.
Modem
A Modem or Modulator Demodulator allow
Communication between computers located at
Different sites.

A Modem basically converts the square shaped


binary signal emitted be the computer to the sine
wave curve transmitted along a telephone line,
and on arrival at the destination a similar device
converts the signal back to binary.

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