Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 19

CorePure1 Chapter 5 ::

Volumes of Revolution
jfrost@tiffin.kingston.sch.uk
www.drfrostmaths.com
@DrFrostMaths

Last modified: 18th September 2019


www.drfrostmaths.com Register now to interactively practise questions on this topic, including
past paper questions and extension questions (including MAT + UKMT).
Everything is completely free. Teachers: you can create student accounts (or students can register
Why not register? themselves), to set work, monitor progress and even create worksheets.

With questions by:

Dashboard with points,


trophies, notifications
and student progress.

Questions organised by topic,


difficulty and past paper.
Teaching videos with topic
tests to check understanding.
Chapter Overview
 This chapter concerns how we can find the volume of a solid when a curve is ‘revolved around
either the or axis.

 1:: Find the volume when a curve  2:: Find the volume when a curve is rotated
is rotated around the -axis. around the -axis.
 “Find the volume of the solid  “Find the volume of the solid formed by
formed by rotating the curve with rotating the curve with equation around
equation around the -axis, the -axis, between the lines and .”
between the lines and .”

 Teacher Notes: Volumes of


3:: Find more complex volumes by Revolution used to be part of C4
adding/subtracting. Integration. The new content is
revolving around the -axis, although
 “An area is bound between the lines this had previously appeared in other
with equations and . This area is exams boards (e.g. OCR).
rotated around the -axis. Find the Due to this being a Year 1 topic,
volume of the resulting solid.” students can only be expected to
integrate polynomials.
Area under a graph
  gives the area bounded between , , and the -axis. Why?

 If we split up the area into thin rectangular strips, each


with width and each with height the for that particular
value of . Each has area .
 𝑦
If
  we had ‘discrete’ strips, the total area would be:
But because the strips are infinitely small and we
have to think continuously, we use instead of .
Integration therefore can be thought of as a
continuous version of summation.

𝑦  1 𝑦  2

𝑑𝑥
  𝑑𝑥 𝑑𝑥 𝑑𝑥 𝑑𝑥 𝑏  𝑥 
𝑎 
Volumes of Revolution
 𝑦  Now suppose we spun the line about
the axis to form a solid (known as a
volume of revolution):

Click to Start
Fromanimation

 𝑦 How could we use the same principle as


before to express the volume? What
should we use instead of strips?
𝑎  𝑏  𝑥  Reveal >>

 
We’re summing a bunch of infinitely thin
cylinders, each of width and radius .
𝑑𝑥
  Each has a volume of:
?
Thus the volume is: !

i.e. Square the function and slap a on front.


?
Example
 [Textbook] The diagram shows the region which is bounded by the -axis, the
-axis and the curve with equation . The region is rotated through about the -axis.
Find the exact volume of the solid generated.
 𝑦
 Find roots first:

𝑦=9−
  𝑥2
Volume:  𝑅
 𝑥
?
Test Your Understanding
Edexcel C4 June 2013(R) Q7c
 
The finite region R which is bounded by the curve C, the
x-axis and the line x = 125 is shown shaded in Figure 3.
This region is rotated through about the x-axis to form a
solid of revolution.
 
Use calculus to find the exact value of the volume of the
solid of revolution. (5)

?
Exercise 5A
Pearson Core Pure Mathematics Year 1
Pages 73-75
 
Revolving around the -axis
 𝑦
  revolve instead around the -axis, we simply
To
swap the roles of the and axes!

 If the curve is revolved around -axis:


𝑏
 
 𝑥
𝑑𝑦 
𝑎  𝑥
 

 [Textbook] The diagram shows the curve with


equation . The region is bounded by the curve, the
-axis and the lines and . The region is rotated

2
through about the -axis. Find the volume of the solid  

𝑥=𝑦 +1
generated.
 𝑦 ?
 3  𝑦= √ 𝑥 − 1
 𝑅
 1
 𝑥
Test Your Understanding

 [Textbook] A curve has equation . The region is bounded by the curve, the -axis
and the lines and . The region is rotated through about the -axis. Find the
volume of the solid generated.

3
 

𝑦 =2𝑥+1 ?
Exercise 5B
Pearson Core Pure Mathematics Year 1
Pages 77-78
Adding and Subtracting Volumes
 𝑦
 
Suppose we wanted to revolve the following area
around the -axis. What strategy might we use to
find the volume of this resulting solid?
 𝑅
Find the volume of revolution for the top curve.
con it is a  𝑥 ? cone.
e. Then cut out (subtract) the
sb
Thi

GCSE Reminders:

1

 
𝑉
2
= 𝜋𝑟 h h    =𝜋 𝑟 2 ?
𝑉 h
3 ?
𝑟  𝑟 
Example
 [Textbook] The region is bounded by the curve with equation ,  𝑦
3
the line and and -axes.  𝑦=𝑥 +2
(a) Verify that the coordinates of are .
A solid is created by rotating the region about the -axis.  𝐴
(b) Find the volume of this solid.
𝑅  𝑦=5 − 2 𝑥
 
𝑂  𝑥
 
   ?a
 Find the two volumes separately:  𝑦
3
 𝑦=𝑥 +2
intersects the -axis at 2.5  𝐴
?b 𝑅  1 𝑅  𝑦=5 − 2 𝑥
 2
It’s a cone!
𝑂  𝑥
   1 2.5
 
Volumes by Subtraction
 [Textbook] The diagram shows the region bounded by the curves  𝑦
with equations and and the line .  𝑦= 1
The region is rotated through about the -axis. Find the exact 8𝑥  𝑦= √ 𝑥
volume of the solid generated.
𝑅
 
  volume under top curve and subtract
Do
 1  𝑥
volume under bottom curve.

Point of intersection:

?
Test Your Understanding
 𝑦
 The area between the lines with equations and , where is
3
rotated about the -axis. Determine the volume of the solid  𝑦= √ 𝑥
generated.
   𝑦= 𝑥
𝑅

 
Intersect at  𝑥

?
Exercise 5C
Pearson Core Pure Mathematics Year 1
Pages 81-83
Modelling
In
  the 1990 film ‘Ghost’. Patrick Swayze (now sadly, also no longer
living) is shot, only to come back as a ghost to resolve ‘unfinished
ghost business’. In one iconic scene, he engages in some saucy
ghost-pottery with fiancé Demi Moore (who is not dead).
The filmmakers want to know how much clay to buy. The
equation of the outside curve can be modelled with the equation

where and are in cm. The pottery spins about the -axis. If the
height of the resulting pottery will be 40cm, determine the
volume of clay needed, giving your answer to 3 significant figures.
#paramountpicturespleasedontsue

 
cm3
?
Real-life
Maths!
Test Your Understanding
[Textbook]
  A manufacturer wants to cast a prototype for a new  𝑦
design for a pen barrel out of solid resin. The shaded region
shown in the diagram is used as a model for the cross-section of
the pen barrel. The region is bounded by the -axis and the curve 𝑦=𝑘
  − 100 𝑥 2
with equation , and will be rotated around the -axis. Each unit on
the coordinate axes represents 1cm.
(a) Suggest a suitable value for . (Let’s say pens are 10cm long)
(b) Use your value of to estimate the volume of resin needed to  𝑥
make the prototype.
(c) State one limitation of this model.

? long)
a  (pens are around 10-15cm c The cross-section of
b the pen is unlikely
? curve
to match the
exactly.

?
Exercise 5D
Pearson Core Pure Mathematics Year 1
Pages 84-86