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FAUSTUS: Ah, Faustus,

Now hast thou but one bare hour to live,


And then thou must be damn’d
perpetually!
Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of
heaven,
That time may cease, and midnight never
come;
Fair Nature’s eye, rise, rise again, and
make
Perpetual day; or let this hour be but
A year, a month, a week, a natural day,
That Faustus may repent and save his
soul!
O lente, lente currite, noctis equi!
The stars move still, time runs, the clock
will strike,
The devil will come, and Faustus must be
damn’d.
O, I’ll leap up to my God! – Who pulls me
down? –
See, see, where Christ’s blood streams in
the firmament!
One drop would save my soul, half a drop:
ah, my Christ! –
Ah, rend not my heart for naming of my
Christ!
Yet will I call on him: O, spare me,
The clock strikes the half-hour.]
Ah, half the hour is past! ’twill all be past anon
O God,
If thou wilt not have mercy on my soul,
Yet for Christ’s sake, whose blood hath ransom’d me,
Impose some end to my incessant pain;
Let Faustus live in hell a thousand years,
A hundred thousand, and at last be sav’d!
O, no end is limited to damned souls!
Why wert thou not a creature wanting soul?
Or why is this immortal that thou hast?
Ah, Pythagoras’ metempsychosis, were that true,
This soul should fly from me, and I be chang’d
Unto some brutish beast! all beasts are happy,
For, when they die,
Their souls are soon dissolv’d in elements;
But mine must live still to be plagu’d in hell.
Curs’d be the parents that engender’d me!
No, Faustus, curse thyself, curse Lucifer
That hath depriv’d thee of the joys of heaven.
[The clock strikes twelve.]
O, it strikes, it strikes! Now, body, turn to air,
Or Lucifer will bear thee quick to hell!
[Thunder and lightning.]
O soul, be chang’d into little water-drops,
And fall into the ocean, ne’er be found!
[Enter DEVILS.]
My God, my god, look not so fierce on me!
Recognizing Gerunds and Gerund Phrases
A verbal is a word formed from a verb but functions as a
different part of speech. A Gerund is a verbal that
functions as noun in a sentence: subject, direct, indirect
object, object preposition, subjective complement and
appositive. It ends in –ing.

Waiting makes Faustus nervous.


Faustus dreads dying.
He has no chance of escaping.
A gerund with its modifiers and complements form a gerund
phrase.

Faustus is haunted by the ticking of the clock.


He fears the coming of Lucifer.
Living in hell for eternity frightens him.
A gerund has a past form. It is formed using the helping verb
having and the past participle of the verb.

Faustus repented having sold his soul to the devil.

Having amassed wealth and knowledge could not save the


soul of Faustus.
A gerund has a passive form. It is formed using the helping
verb being and the past participle of the verb.

The heart of Faustus was a filled with one desire, being


saved.

He regrets being deprived of the joys of heaven.


Identifying the Functions of Gerund
As a noun, a gerund or gerund phrase can have the following
uses:

1. As subject

Waiting makes Faustus nervous.


Waiting is the subject of the verb makes.
Living in the hell for eternity frightens him.

The gerund phrase is the subject of the verb frightens.

2. As direct object

Faustus dreads dying.

Dying is the direct object of the verb dreads.


He fears the coming of Lucifer.

The gerund phrase is the direct object of the verb fears.

3. As object of the preposition

Faustus has no chance of escaping.

Escaping is the object of the preposition of.


He is haunted by the ticking of the clock.

The gerund phrase is the object of the preposition by.

4. As predicate nominative or subject complement

An option for Faustus would be repenting.

His last wish was saving his soul from the eternal
fires of hell.
The sentences are inverse sentences in I. The gerund and
gerund phrase come after the subject.
5. An appositive

The heart of Faustus was filled with one desire, being


saved.

His fears, suffering in hell for all time, consumes him.

The gerund and gerund phrase rename the noun.


Distinguishing Gerunds from Present Participle
and Verb in the Progressive Tense.

Present Past Past Participle Present


Indicative Participle
repent repented repented repenting
sell sold sold selling
strike struck struck striking
drink drank drunk drinking Same
lie lay lain lying present form
Gerund.
1. Gerund
Waiting makes Faustus nervous.
(The word functions as subject of the sentence.)

2. Present Participle

Waiting servants stand by the door of his chamber.


(The word functions as a modifier of the subject servants)
3. Gerund
He fears the coming of Lucifer.
(The word functions as direct object of the sentence.)

4. Present Participle

Coming for the soul of Faustus, the devil waits.


(The word functions as modifier of the subject devil.)
The present participle is also used with the progressive tenses
which show an action or condition as on going or in progress. In the
following examples, notice how the present participle of the main
verb combines with the various tenses of the verb be.

1.Present progressive

The farmers are harvesting their crops.

2.Past progressive

The farmers were harvesting their crops when the heavy rains fell.
3.Future progressive
The farmers will be harvesting their crops in May.

4.Present perfect progressive

The farmers have been harvesting their crops since dawn.

5.Past perfect progressive


The farmers had been harvesting their crops before the storm hit.

6. Future perfect progressive


The farmers will have been harvesting their crops before the day ends.