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THREE-PHASE STEP-UP DCDC CONVERTER

Presented by Muhammed Salih U P S1 M-Tech GECT


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OVERVIEW

Introduction Proposed converter and The operation principle


Circuit Description Analysis of Operation

Operation Regions

Power stage
DC Transfer Function Control Design Conclusion References
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INTRODUCTION

The great necessity in several areas, particularly the


industrial sector, for switch mode power converters with larger power ratings The advantages of three-phase dcdc isolated solutions are as follows Reduction of the input and output filters volume Lower rms current levels through the power components
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TYPICAL THREE-PHASE DCDC CONVERTER ARCHITECTURE

Consist of inverter rectifier set

Filter unit to reduce ripple content


Transformer for step up and step down
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PROPOSED CONVERTER AND THE OPERATION PRINCIPLE


Circuit Description

The left side of the circuit (inverter) comprises three

inductors and three switches connected to a dc link The right side of the circuit is a traditional three-branch sixdiode rectifier with a capacitive output filter
The

three-phase step-up characteristics are as follows

dcdc

isolated

converter

Inverter (left-side) circuit presents a low input ripple current The output-voltage ripple is reduced due to the three pulse output current Only the three switches connected to the same reference attribute simplicity The voltage level applied across the switches is reduced due to the employed transformer.
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Analysis of Operation
Assumptions made for analysis
Tr1 is modelled as an ideal transformer with turns ratio n = 1 Magnetizing inductance is large enough that it can be neglected

Filter capacitor C is large enough that its output-voltage ripple is

small compared to its dc voltage. All semiconductor components are ideal

A PWM technique is used for switches S1, S2, and S3

Operation Regions

Each one differs from each other by the number of switches in the ON state at the same time Due to the converters input-current-source characteristic, at least one switch must always be on

Operations for Region R2


1) First Stage (t0, t1)
In t0, switch S1 is turned on and conducts along with switch S3. Inductances

L1 and L3 store energy from source E. The energy stored in L2 is transferred to the load through D2, D4, and D6 This stage finishes in t1 when S3 is turned off.

2) Second Stage (t1, t2)


In t1, S3 is turned off, and the energy stored in L2 and L3 is transferred to the load through D3, D2, and D4 This stage finishes in t2 when S2 is turned on

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Third Stage (t2, t3)


In t2, the energy of source E is stored in inductances L1 and L2. The energy stored in L3 continues to be transferred to the load through D3,

D4, and D5. This stage finishes in t3 when S1 is turned off

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4) Fourth stage (t3, t4)


In t3, the energy stored in L1 and L3 is transferred to the load through D1, D3,

and D5 This stage finishes in t4 when S3 is turned on.the switches for the converter operation in region R2

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5) Fifth Stage (t4, t5)


In t4, the energy of source E is stored in inductances L2 and L3 The energy stored in L1 continues to be transferred to the load through D1,

D5, and D6.


This stage finishes in t5 when S2 is turned off.

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6) Sixth Stage (t5, t6)


The converters last stage of operation in a TS switching period starts at t5,

when S2 is turned off. The energy from source E stored in inductances L2 and L1 is then transferred to the load through D1, D2, and D6. In t6, a switching period is finished.

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(a) Command pulses. (b) L1 inductor current. (c) L2 inductor voltage. (d) D1 output diode current. (e) D5 and D6 diode currents. (f) S1 switch current. (g) Output capacitor current. (h) Primary winding voltage. (i) Primary winding current.

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Region R3

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Steady-State Stage Operations for Region R3


First Stage (t0, t1)
In t0, switch S1 is turned on and conducts along with switches S2 and S3.
Inductances L1, L2, and L3 stored energy from source E. This stage finishes in t1 when S2 is turned off.

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2) Second Stage (t1, t2)


In t1, S2 is turned off, and the energy stored in L2 is transferred

to the load through diodes D2, D4, and D6. This stage finishes in t2 when S2 is turned on

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Third Stage (t2, t3)


In t2, S2 is turned on, and the first stage is repeated, with the energy of the

source being stored in inductances L1, L2, and L3. This stage finishes in t3 when S3 is turned off.

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4) Fourth Stage (t3, t4)


When S3 is turned off, the energy stored in L3 is transferred to the load

through D3, D4, and D5. This stage finishes in t4 when S3 is turned on again.

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5) Fifth Stage (t4, t5)


In t4, S3 is turned on, and the first stage is repeated, with the energy off the

source being stored in inductances L1, L2, and L3. This stage finishes in t5 when S1 is turned off.

6) Sixth Stage (t5, t6)


The last stage starts at t5, with S1 being turned off and the energy stored in

inductance L1 being transferred to the load through diodes D1, D5, and D6. In t6, one period of switching operation is concluded.

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(a) Command pulses. (b) L1 inductor current. (c) L2 inductor voltage. (d) D1 output diode current. (e) D5 and D6 diode currents. (f) S1 switch current. (g) Output capacitor current. (h) Primary winding voltage. (i) Primary winding current.

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III. POWER STAGE

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IV. DC TRANSFER FUNCTION


Three modes of conduction of the converter

can be observed. The output/ input voltage gain q or the dc transfer function for operation area R2 in CCM is limited to a maximum of three times the transformers turns ratio The duty cycle must be higher than 33% for the correct functionality of the converter

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V. CONTROL DESIGN
The average current-mode control technique applied to the

regulation of both input current and output voltage of the converter There are two loops, namely, inner current loop and outer voltage loop Gi(s) is the control-to-input-current transfer function, where the controlled variable is the input current IE(s) and the control variable is the duty ratio d(s). Gv(s) is the line-to-output or input current-to-output-voltage transfer function. Ci(s) and Cv(s) are the current and voltage compensators, respectively. Vref and Iref are the references to be reached.
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CONCLUSION
The three-phase step-up dcdc isolated converter controlled by an

average current-mode strategy has greater efficiency with reduced weight and size. This converter can be used in all applications that require a reduced input ripple current, e.g., in industrial applications where the dc input voltage is lower than the output voltage, for instance, in installations fed by battery units, PV arrays, or FC systems. Control model employed is simple, with its very satisfactory results.

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REFERENCES
[1] Srgio Vidal Garcia Oliveira and Ivo Barbi A Three-Phase Step-Up DCDC Converter With a Three-Phase High-Frequency Transformer for DC Renewable Power Source Applications in IEEE Trans Industrial electronics ., vol. 58, no. 8, Aug. 2011.

[2] D. S. Oliveira, Jr. and I. Barbi, A three-phase ZVS PWM DC/DC converter with asymmetrical duty cycle associated with a three-phase version of the hybridge rectifier, IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 354360, Mar. 2005.
[3] S. V. G. Oliveira and I. Barbi, A three-phase step-up DCDC converter with a threephase high frequency transformer, in Proc. IEEE ISIE, Jun. 2023, 2005, vol. 2, pp. 571 576. [4] C. P. Dick, A. Konig, and R.W. De Doncker, Comparison of three-phase DCDC converters vs. single-phase DCDC converters, in Proc. 7th Int. Conf. PEDS, Nov. 2730, 2007, pp. 217224. [5] P. D. Ziogas, A. R. Prazad, and S. Manias, Analysis and design of the three-phase offline DCDC converter with high frequency isolation, in Conf. Rec. IEEE IAS Annu. Meeting, 1988, pp. 813820.

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