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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Maintenance Supervisor By HSE/Sadek Fathy Captain . Mohd Essalamy

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

All maintenance work performed on a company facility shall be done in accordance with the requirements established in the Personnel Safety Manual and Permit to Work Manual.

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Source from AMS (Atlantic marine service) AMS operate many rigs at many countries all over the world. Pyramid drilling company (Rig BENNEVIS)

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PURPOSE The purpose of this course is to put the attendee in a proper level of knowledge about the:
Maintain/enhance maintenance program(s) to ensure that rig/unit equipment are efficiently maintained and that the equipment is safe, in compliance with all regulatory requirements, and available for service when required.

The Maintenance Management System (MMS) is an integral part of the Quality Management System (QMS) described in the Quality Management Manual (QMM).
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APPLICABILITY Maintenance management requirements apply to all personnel involved in the:


selection, operation, testing, and maintenance of equipment facilities. The requirements of those manual cover all facilities and all equipment used.

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Day 1st.

Session 1 0900-1030
Registration, introduction to safety in the MSI, on board and emergency situations. Operation and Maintenance Introduction.

Session 2 (1100-1230)
Operation and Maintenance Policies. Maintenance procedures and schedules. Records and Handover.

Session 3 (1300-1400)
Operation and Maintenance of commissioning new and repaired equipment.

2nd

Inspections and Failure reports. Example (Pad Eyes). Safe working practices

Maintenance and repair process description (Pad Eyes). Safe working practices

Relationship to the maintenance supervisor and the safe working practices activates. Safety equipment and Workshop: o Maintenance of survival crafts and launching appliances. o Firefighting equipment inspection. o Pollution prevention procedures.

3rd

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Day 1

Day 2

Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 Session 1 Session 2 Session 3

Day 3

Session 1 Session 2 Session 3

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Knowledge, Experience, Technology.

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The requirements for conducting rig maintenance are presented as individual Maintenance Policies (MP). Each policy covers the essential elements of each major component of the maintenance management program. The planning maintenance system can be found most properly in detail in the users guide end
MAXIMO/TAG/
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The MMS targets to:


Provide maintenance/inspection guidance for all employees, contractors, and others involved in the operation and maintenance facilities. Ensure that the services operated by the company are cost-effectively and properly maintained. Comply with the regulatory requirements. Optimize the maintenance performed on company
to control costs, meet customers requirements, and ensure personnel and environmental safety.

Establish regional and corporate performance measures that allow all levels of the organization to gauge their performance and identify areas for improvement.
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Identify and manage the needs of:

Maximize the mean time to failure and extend the life cycle of equipment. Minimize unplanned rig downtime due to equipment failures. Reduce maintenance costs through the optimum combination of both calendar-based and predictivebased preventative and breakdown maintenance. Control the costs of maintaining spare parts.
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shareholders, customers, employees, regulators, and the general public affected by company maintenance activities.

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The MMS provides the following basic tools to allow the company to meet the goals described above:

A preventative maintenance (PM) program that establishes a routine of inspections and maintenance activities to improve the availability of critical equipment. A Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM) program that analyzes equipment performance to anticipate failures before they occur

A total productive maintenance system (e.g., MAXIMO) or planning maintenance system , TAG system that provides integrated control of the maintenance processes.

An equipment failure investigation process that allows the causes of failures to be identified accurately and corrective actions to be implemented.

to enable overhauls and major maintenance to occur just in time, and to optimize preventative maintenance scheduling activities.

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Procedures for commissioning new or repaired equipment; refer to the Control of Rig Modification procedure. Procedures for the acquisition and control of spare parts. Procedures for the documentation and tracking of equipment history.

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All company has the responsibility to comply with specific regulations and standards in the operation and maintenance of its worldwide facilities. These standards and regulations form a part of this manual: Examples:
the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) CFR Subchapters I-A, J, Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), Jones Act.
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Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations as applicable Legislative and regulatory requirements imposed by a coastal state. Classification society requirements Flag state requirements

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Industry standards, including, but not limited to:

National Electric Code National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) American Petroleum Institute (API) Standards and Recommended Practices American National Standards Institute (ANSI) American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Underwriters Laboratories (UL) as applicable National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) International Electro technical Commission (IEC) standards as applicable American Welding Society (AWS) standards as applicable International Maritime Organization (IMO) standards as applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes as applicable Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) rules for maritime radio installations as found applicable MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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VICE-PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS

Maintenance Superintendents

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

Rig/Operations Manager

MECHANICAL SUPERVISOR/RIG MECHANIC

PERSON IN CHARGE (PIC)

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VICE-PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

The Vice President, Operations is responsible for ensuring that the requirements established in this manual are met on each of the facilities operates and that the equipment used on company facilities is properly maintained.
The Technical Director is responsible for developing an effective MMS for each company facility, including the necessary administrative tools and technical support to allow each rig to implement an effective maintenance program.
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Maintenance Superintendents have several responsibilities on the rigs assigned to their area, including:
Developing forecasts for maintenance needs, plans, and budgets Developing and reviewing maintenance procedures, guidelines, and schedules Developing spare parts inventory requirements in consultation with the Rig Mechanic/Rig Mechanical Supervisor and PIC

PIC= person in charge

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Providing technical support to the PIC and Mechanical Supervisor/Rig Mechanic as required Reviewing rig maintenance activities and providing monthly reports to the rigs, indicating:
potential maintenance problems and solutions;
coordinating with other maintenance superintendents and communicating solutions to problems common to all rigs.

PIC= person in charge

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Ensuring that the PM System is properly used and implemented, where applicable; identifying and implementing improvements to the PM System. Developing equipment repair and replacement schedules and associated budgets. Reducing overall maintenance costs by achieving the best balance between preventative, predictive, and breakdown maintenance strategies.

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The Operations/Rig Manager is responsible for monitoring rig adherence to maintenance policies and standards, including:
Overseeing and analyzing maintenance activities Reviewing rig maintenance records, reports, and other documentation to monitor effective maintenance operations

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Inspecting all areas of the rigs to check that equipment and facilities are well maintained Ensuring that Mechanical Supervisors/Rig Mechanics are informed of any maintenance issues Reviewing maintenance activities for inclusion into the annual plan and budget.

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The PIC ensures that the rig is maintained in accordance with the requirements of the MMS and is responsible for the implementation of, and compliance with, the established policies, rules, procedures, guidelines, and schedules.

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The Mechanical Supervisor/Rig Mechanic is responsible for the day-to-day implementation of the MMS and directs maintenance personnel in the safe and effective execution of maintenance activities according to the established policies, rules, procedures, guidelines, and schedules.

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Availability

Breakdown Maintenance

Ability of equipment to carry out a required function within a specified time, considering both equipment reliability and amount of maintenance required. A maintenance practice that allows equipment to remain in use until the unit fails; repairs are made only after a failure occurs. Also referred to as run-to-failure (RTF) maintenance. The operations required following installation of equipment to prove it acceptable for service; includes verification of conformity with the terms of the contract. The individual numbered units that go together to make up a piece of equipment.
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Commissioning

Component Parts

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Condition-Based Maintenance
Preventative maintenance initiated as a result of a predetermined indicator. Condition-based maintenance (CBM) inputs include self-diagnosis facility, signals from a sensor, wear out measurements, oil analysis, and temperature and vibration analysis. These indicators are used to assess the condition of deterioration of the components on the equipment and to determine the optimum timing of their repair or replacement.

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Corrective Maintenance Critical Equipment

Repairs performed to correct equipment deficiencies after the failure has occurred.
Equipment crucial to the safety of personnel and the environment. Critical equipment failures may directly endanger a life, damage the environment, or create environmental hazards. Critical equipment can also impact regulatory certifications dealing with safety and the environment, possibly resulting in the loss of legal certification for safetyor environmental-related equipment.
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Daily and Weekly Checks Debugging Defect

The servicing and condition-monitoring activities performed on various pieces of equipment in the course of normal duty rounds. The identification and isolation of the parts or components of equipment that have failed or are performing unsatisfactorily. Also referred to as troubleshooting. A routine failure of a piece of equipment or one of its components that occurs from normal use and wear.

Deficiency

An unusual failure or deterioration of a piece of equipment resulting in failure to fulfill its intended function. See also partial deficiency and total deficiency.
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Detection

Diagnosis

The systematic monitoring of equipment for defects, deficiencies, and faulty components. The identification of the most likely cause of a failure or deficiency based on the information gained from debugging activities, including inspections, evaluations, and testing, to determine the corrective maintenance actions necessary to correct the problem. A specified monitoring activity consisting of a set of detailed examinations that thoroughly assess the condition of the equipment. The determination of the identity and location of the parts or components that caused the defect, deficiency, or failure.

Equipment Condition Evaluations


Fault-Finding

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Final Settings Installation

The tests, adjustments, and modifications required to obtain the specified conditions of operation. The placement of equipment and its accessories in position and the making up of interconnections to other systems as necessary. The current cataloged company assets and spare parts, including equipment, repair parts, materials, tools, oils, and greases.

Inventory

Levels of Maintenance

The assignment of levels of expertise to maintenance tasks to aid planning and safe execution of the associated activities.
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Maintainability Maintenance

The relative ease with which equipment can be maintained or repaired when the maintenance is carried out according to prescribed procedures. The actions necessary to keep a piece of equipment in, or to restore it to, a specified operating condition or capability, and to ensure a specified service life. A technical document that specifies the maintenance and operational requirements for a related family of equipment. Equipment that is crucial to Rig Operations and represents a large investment by the company. Deficiencies on major equipment may stop or severely impair drilling or other rig operations, resulting in significant expense and loss of revenue.

Maintenance Standard
Major Equipment

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Minor Equipment
Equipment that does not meet any of the requirements of critical or major equipment.

Modification
The alteration of equipment to improve its function or to change its operating characteristics.

Mothballing
Preservation operations performed on equipment to ensure its survival during long periods of disuse.

Noncritical Equipment
Equipment, both major and minor, that is not crucial to safety, environmental protection, or rig operations.
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Overhaul

Partial Deficiency

Examination, inspection, and maintenance activities that are carried out to safeguard equipment against any major or critical defect or deficiency for a given period of time or number of operations. It is customary to make a distinction between a partial and general overhaul depending on the extent of the maintenance activities required. In both cases, this operation implies the removal and replacement of various sub-units. An overhaul can be routinely scheduled or determined by condition-based equipment diagnosis. The failure of a piece of equipment to fulfill some portion of its intended function or to deliver full capacity while remaining operational.
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Preventative Maintenance
Routine maintenance performed to prescribed criteria, usually based on manufacturer recommendations, which reduces the probability of equipment failure and the deterioration of operating capability and capacity. Preventative maintenance can be either systematic or condition-based (see corresponding definitions).

Preventative Maintenance (PM) Task


A documented maintenance requirement for a specific manufacturer and model of equipment that is in accordance with applicable maintenance standards. The PM task is procedural and includes the servicing and condition checks to be performed by each department.
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Repair

Systematic Preventative Maintenance

Corrective maintenance performed on defective equipment to restore it to a fully functional condition. Preventative maintenance activities performed on a schedule, either calendar-based or based on the number of operating hours, without regard to actual equipment condition. A compromise maintenance action performed on deficient or defective equipment to restore it to an operational condition that is not in full compliance with design specifications. This type of repair is provisional and is followed by a permanent repair when conditions permit.
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Temporary Repair

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Test
An operation that measures the performance of a component or system when specified demands and inputs are made and compares it to the desired performance specifications for the component or system.

Total Deficiency
A deficiency that results in the inability of a piece of equipment to fulfill its required function.

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Each rig will have a functioning preventative maintenance (PM) program in place that meets the following criteria:

Schedules of these activities, Routine equipment maintenance Certification, testing, and inspection of equipment as required by regulations Equipment inspections and monitoring for input into the condition-based maintenance program Major equipment repairs and testing
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Provides for the unique identification of all major assets installed or in use on the rig Offers a mean of recording and tracking maintenance history, including equipment breakdowns and maintenance and repairs performed. Uses the PMS System for cataloging spare parts with links to equipment numbers, and including quantity in stock and on order Uses the PMS System to identify and locate special tooling and equipment required for maintenance activities Uses the PMS System to perform routine evaluation of the PM system to improve effectiveness

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Each rig will have a functioning condition-based maintenance (CBM) program in place that meets the following criteria:

Establishes an equipment-monitoring program with appropriate documentation procedures for recording, trending, reviewing, and reporting program data; types of monitoring to be considered include: Visual inspections includes checking for unusual noises, excessive heat or vibration, unusual odors, and other abnormal indications that experienced personnel would detect Lube oil analysis checks both the lubricating properties of the oil and for machinery wear products
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Fuel sampling checks for moisture content and impurities Vibration analysis detects mechanical problems on rotating equipment, including misalignment, dynamic imbalance, looseness, bad bearings, and gear defects Coolant analysis checks for proper chemistry and wear products

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Thermography uses infrared imaging to measure equipment surface-temperature distributions to detect hot spots and heat buildup due to mechanical or electrical overload Electrical insulation test includes megger tests, highpotting, and polarization index testing B.O.P. control fluid sampling checks for moisture content and impurities Radiography and nondestructive testing (NDT) checks for loss of material from corrosion and erosion on structures and piping systems Establishes guidelines for scheduling of PM activities and equipment overhauls based on monitoring reports and all other available information, including industry standards, industry association databases, equipment history, and manufacturer recommendation
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Maintenance schedules shall be developed for all safety critical rig equipment. These schedules shall be developed to ensure compliance with mandated regulations and standards. Other inputs to the maintenance schedule include the PM and CBM programs, operating company contractual requirements, location-specific environmental issues, and rig and lifesaving equipment safety inspections. Completion of scheduled maintenance activities shall be recorded and the schedule reviewed every 6 months, for example, along with equipment performance, and updated as appropriate.
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The review shall include:


Schedule compliance, i.e., identify any scheduled items not completed and why Availability of critical systems and equipment Cost of maintenance performed

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Root cause of any failures experienced Quantified benefit of improving equipment performance by additional preventative maintenance (i.e., cost of additional maintenance versus cost of failure) Work planned for next 6 months, and inventory and availability of the parts and materials required

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Each rig/unit shall have documented procedures for maintenance activities that meet any of the following criteria:
The activity requires multiple steps to be completed in an exact sequence that maintenance personnel, even with adequate experience to perform the task, could not be expected to remember without a reference.

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The activity requires technical data, e.g., torque values, clearances, switch settings, that are not readily available from technical references on the rig and are not common knowledge to the maintenance personnel performing the task. The activity presents a significant hazard to personnel, the rig, or the environment if not performed correctly, and following a written procedure would help prevent mistakes. A less experienced person could perform the activity safely if a written procedure were used.
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The activity is performed on critical rig equipment that could have a significant impact on rig operations if not performed correctly, and following a written procedure would aid in preventing mistakes. The activity requires quality checks and measurements during the performance of the activity. The activity is governed by a regulation that requires specific documentation requirements that can best be assured by following a written procedure with appropriate forms. Training is required on the activity and the procedure could serve as a training aid.
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The Rig Mechanic/Maintenance Supervisor shall be responsible for maintaining accurate records of maintenance activities that occur during his/her hitch and ensuring that this information is included in the equipment history maintained manually or electronically MMS (PMS). The following is the minimum information to be included in the equipment history:
All repair procedures performed Spare parts used Any failure, including date of failure, corrective maintenance performed, and cause of failure, if known

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Any planned maintenance, including minor or major overhauls Results of all tests performed on the equipment, including date of test and persons performing tests Any damage to the equipment that occurs for any reason Any third-party work done on the equipment, including name of third party, scope of work, and location where work was performed Any special tooling required for the maintenance of the equipment
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At the end of each hitch, each Rig Mechanic/Mechanical Supervisor shall prepare a set of handover notes as required by the Handover Report procedure and include the following maintenance information: A chronological listing of all maintenance activities that occurred in his or her area of responsibilities during the hitch An account of any significant maintenance problems and the solutions found A listing of any outstanding or open maintenance items
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Fuel inventory Update on any problems or issues that may affect the maintenance effort going forward Safety critical equipment requiring priority attention The Rig Mechanic/Maintenance Supervisor must forward to the rig Maintenance Superintendent a copy of all maintenance records of maintenance activities that occurred during the hitch on safety critical equipment.

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Each rig shall follow these record-retention requirements:


All engine logs shall be maintained on the rig for a specific period e.g. 5 years.
After 5 years, the originals shall be forwarded to the rig Maintenance Superintendent, who will arrange for storage for the life of the rig.

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All other maintenance reports and records shall be maintained on the rig for a specific period e.g. 1 year,
at which time they shall be sent to the Maintenance Superintendent assigned to the rig, who will arrange for storage for the life of the equipment.

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The history of all work done on a piece of equipment assigned to the rig shall be maintained on the rig for as long as the equipment remains assigned to the rig.
When the equipment is removed from the rig and no longer assigned to the rig inventory, the records shall be sent to the Maintenance Superintendent assigned to the rig.

The Rig Mechanic/Maintenance Supervisor shall review the records during the first week of the month and forward all records past their retention date to the Maintenance Superintendent.
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All equipment failures or damage shall be documented in accordance with the Equipment Failure Report procedure Any equipment failure that results in significant cost to the company either due to repair costs or lost revenue will be thoroughly investigated by the Maintenance Superintendent.

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The root cause of the failure should be established and corrective action initiated to prevent reoccurrence. The Operations/Rig Manager must ensure that the failure cause is identified and that effective corrective actions are implemented.

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Spare parts are an asset and as such are to be controlled and managed by the PIC assigned to the rig.

The rig Operations Manager is responsible for determining which parts will be maintained on the rig and which spares will be maintained in the warehouse inventory.
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All parts shall be documented upon receipt at the rig and upon issue. Spare parts assigned to the rig shall be inventoried every 12 months and the inventory compared against the rig records. The PIC is responsible for reconciling any difference between the physical inventory and the records maintained on the rig.

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All maintenance work performed on a company facility shall be done in accordance with the requirements established in the Personnel Safety Manual and Permit to Work Manual.

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Major rig equipment and systems that are newly installed or have just undergone significant repairs shall not be placed into service until a detailed commissioning plan is developed and approved; refer to Control of Rig Modification procedure . The plan should set out verification of operating parameters to confirm that the equipment or system is operating properly. The Maintenance Superintendent is responsible for developing and implementing this plan, which must at a minimum include the following: Identification of preoperational inspections to be completed to ensure all fasteners, safety equipment, and personnel protection have been properly installed and that the equipment is ready to be placed in service
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Step-by-step procedure for placing the equipment in service Identification of critical operating parameters and a means of measuring performance relative to these parameters Identification of the power supply source to the equipment, and other systems affected by the operation of the equipment

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Identification of any personnel hazards and the steps to control the hazards Identification of all tools, instruments, and resources necessary to place the equipment in service and to perform the necessary test The Rig Mechanic/Maintenance Supervisor shall maintain a record of all equipment commissioning and include the equipment maintenance history.
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MAXIMO

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PURPOSE
The purpose of this procedure is to define the requirements for reporting all equipment failures, damage, and near misses in order to learn from these events and to prevent them from reoccurring.

SCOPE
This procedure applies to Atlantic Marine Services offshore installations, onshore support facilities, and sites owned or operated. This procedure may be used in conjunction with the Incident Investigation and Reporting procedure
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Equipment Failure: Any equipment that suffers a malfunction or failure or requires a repair where human error is not a primary contributing factor. RESPONSIBILITIES
It is the responsibility of the Technical Director to administer, interpret, and maintain this document.

REFERENCES
Incident Investigation and Reporting.

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Process Step

1-Equipment Failure Or Damage Identified Description


PIC and Rig Management Team:
Identify equipment failure or damage.

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PIC:

Compile Equipment Failure Report . In conjunction with Mechanical Supervisor and Barge Captain, complete the following items (indicating the remedial activity required):
Estimated downtime/repair time Estimated cost of failure Class inspection required JSA required Change in PM routine Change of procedure Rig Managers summary required Safety evaluation required Other (identify any other item not listed)
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PIC and Mechanical Supervisor: Recommend and/or identify corrective actions. Notify the Operators offshore representative of the issue.

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PIC:
Send to Operations/Rig Manager for signature and approval

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Rig/Operations Manager:
Approve, add, or modify actions as appropriate. Distribute report to: QA Manager HSE/QA Department VP International/Domestic Operations
Note: When necessary, communicate all Equipment Failure Reports to the fleet via e-mail.

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PIC and Rig Management Team:


Initiate the corrective actions required, using the Equipment Failure Report as the front sheet. Attach additional documentation, e.g., JSA or Class Inspection, as a job package.

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HSE Director:
Review report and corrective action and distribute to:
Maintenance Engineering Department Risk Department Operations

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PIC, Rig/Operations Manager, and HSE Director:


Monitor progress and closure of any open corrective actions. Initiate improvements or safeguards, as appropriate, based upon analysis and trends.

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PURPOSE SCOPE

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidelines for performing pad eye inspections. This procedure applies to all rigs and satisfies regulations that require at least one inspection each year of all pad eyes. Nondestructive testing (NDT):
A method of determining metal wall thickness and detecting internal and surface defects in metallic components using non damaging techniques, including ultrasonic testing (UT) and magnetic particle inspection (MPI). A method of verifying the rated capacity of a pad eye.

DEFINITIONS

Load Testing:

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RESPONSIBILITIES
It is the responsibility of the Vice President Engineering and Technical Services to administer, interpret, and maintain this document.

REFERENCES
Personnel Safety Manual Equipment Failure Report

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PIC, Mechanical Supervisor, and Operations/Rig Manager: Schedule pad eye inspections so they do not to interfere with drilling operations, but no less than one time each year for each pad eye.
Visual Magnetic Partial Inspection (MPI)

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PIC and Operations/Rig Manager:


Obtain and evaluate proposals for performing the scheduled pad eye inspections from approved NDT contractors. Choose the third-party contractor for performing the NDT inspection in accordance with AMS procurement procedures.

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PIC and HSE Manager:


Notify the regulatory authorities of the scheduled inspection. Coordinate regulatory agency observation of inspections, if needed.

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PIC:
Direct Mechanical Supervisor and third-party NDT Technician to assemble required equipment, including:
Portable hand grinders Sandblast equipment Ultrasonic test (UT) equipment MPI equipment Ensure all test equipment has current calibration certificates that are not more than 12 months old. Obtain ladders or erect scaffolding as required to access the pad eyes.
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Mechanical Supervisor:
Perform load test on each pad eye in accordance with approved procedures. Observe applicable safety requirements in accordance with the Personnel Safety Manual . Record the results of the load tests.
Note: Contact Engineering to prepare a procedure before load testing pad eyes rated greater than 50 tons.

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Mechanical Supervisor and NDT Company Technician:


Direct maintenance personnel in the grit blasting and grinding operations necessary to prepare each pad eye for NDT.

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NDT Company Technician:


Perform NDT on the pad eyes. Record results of inspections.

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Mechanical Supervisor:
Determine if there are any indications from the NDT that require repair. If yes, go to Step 9, Repair Indications. If no, go to Step 12, Prepare And Submit Reports.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Mechanical Supervisor:

Develop a work scope and quality plan for any areas needing repair. Direct maintenance personnel in repairing any indications as required by the Class Surveyor. Follow these requirements for repair methods used: Remove indications by grinding, gouging, or gas cutting. Ensure all material is class certified, including the electrodes. Use only class-certified welders and approved procedures to perform weld repairs. Prepare an Equipment Failure Report form for any indications that cannot be repaired.
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Mechanical Supervisor:
Perform load test on each pad eye in accordance with approved procedures. Observe applicable safety requirements in accordance with the Personnel Safety Manual. Record the results of the load tests

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NDT Company Technician:


Perform NDT on repaired pad eyes as shown on welding procedures. Record the results of the inspections.

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PIC:
Collect recorded results of inspections from Mechanical Supervisor and NDT Company Technician for input to inspection report. Submit load test results, NDT inspection certificates, repair procedures, and repair reports to the Operations/Rig Manager.

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Thank you

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Relationship between the maintenance supervisor Job description and the safe working practice activities.

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Permit to work. Job safety analyses (risk assessment).

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Example of permit to work

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1.

Person in charge of the work ----------------------------


Hot Work Confined Space Entry Work Above Open water

Position ------
Heavy or unusual Lift

Diving

Explosive Work / Radioactive Work

Working with Hazardous substances

Energy Systems

Critical Systems

Man Riding

Web sling usage for special lifts

Other cold work

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Rig: ---------------------------------------------------------

Location: ----------

Brief Description of Work: -----------------------------------------------------------


Starting Time: ------------------------- Date: ------------------Actual Completion Time: -------------

Written Instructions ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Documented Procedure reviewed or referenced: -------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

2.

The following areas / items have been inspected and are required for the work:

Standby watchman Fire watch (uninterrupted) Fire watch[equipment

Access / escape route Isolation

Face / eye protection Fall protection Flotation device

Safely barriers Other / Signalman

Portable gas detector LEL percent


Oxygen percent Ventilation

Fluid / gas free


Vented Water flushed

Gloves
Respirator

Taglines
Radio silence Standby boat

Breathing apparatus

Static ground

Portable radio

Ear protection Lighting MSI-AAST&MT Copyright


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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Check the type of identified hazards associated with this work permit:
pinch points Explosive gas / vapors Visibility Respiratory

Slipping /tripping

Falling



Pressure

Temperature extremes

\

Chemical / corrosives

Poisonous gas / vapors



High noise level

Energy source

Heavy lifting

Low oxygen

Falling objects


Exertion

Simultaneous operations

Struck by

Flying particles

Pollution

Caught between ) (

Contacting energy

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

4. Circle one (to be completed by the Person In Charge of the Work)


yes / no Has the complete plan for safely conducting the work been effectively communicated to each person who will be performing this work? yes / no Does everyone understand the plan, their part in the plan and the controls required?

) (

yes / no Have all persons who may be affected by this work been adequately informed of the consequences and any precautions required? yes / no Is it safe to proceed?

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

5.Energy Isolation Certificate Number: ( )

( )

Firewatcher: (if applicable) ------ (name) - 1 Relieving firewatcher: ----------- (name) ------2 Standby watchman: ---(name) --- 1 Relieving watchman: --(name) --- 2

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

In relation to this permit and as the responsible person, I shall take all practical steps to ensure the safety of the personnel and installation. A copy of this permit is given to the person performing the work. Any additional control measures required:-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Person in charge of work: ---------------------------------------------- (name) -------------------------------------------------1 Relieving Person in charge of work-----------------------------------(name)--------------------------------------------------2 Responsible person: ----------------------------------------------------(name) --------------------------------------------------1 Relieving Responsible person:-----------------------------------------( name) ----------------------------------------------2

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

I am satisfied that the work has been adequately planned and approve the work to be carried out according to the specifications of this Permit To Work. C.S.E : ---------------------------------------

OIM / Designee: ----------------- (signature) | .


(name)------------------

Client Rep: (signature)

-------

---name)-------

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Reason for Permit suspension: ----------------------------------------------------------------- Suspended by:------ : Time: ---------------- Date: -------------- Re-activated by: ------------ Time: ------------------- Date:----

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Work is completed / not completed (circle one) \ ( )and is in a safe condition. Tools / materials / equipment have been removed and the area is clean and orderly. Normal operations may / may not (circle one) be resumed. ( ) \ Safety systems have been uninhibited. In the case of isolation, full function has been restored.

Responsible Person: ----------------(name) ----------------------------------------- OIM: ------------------(name) --------------(signature) Time received: --------Date: -------------

Distribution :

original ( white ) OIM 1st Copy : Person in Charge Of Work - 2nd Copy : Display at Work Site - MSI-AAST&MT
3/10/2012

Copyright
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Safe Working Practices

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Safety working practice operations

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Hazards Planning Additional Personal Protection Equipment Proper Lifting Technique Additional Lifting Guidelines Stacking and Storage of Materials

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Purpose Operator Certification Pre operation Checks General Precautions Loading and Unloading Parking and Refueling

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Operator Certification Operator Responsibilities Pre operation Checks Pre-Lift Safety Meeting General Precautions Crane Operation Load Handling Operations

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Hazards Pre-Planning Additional Personal Protection Equipment General Precautions Derrick Work Work Over Water

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Smoking Policy General Precautions Firefighting Equipment Fire Detection and Alarms Fire Drills

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Hazards General Requirements Additional Personal Protection Equipment Gas Cylinders, Hoses, and Torches Preparation Igniters Gas Welding and Cutting Electric Arc Welding and Burning Grinding Operations
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
3/10/2012 12 7

Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Purpose Storage Requirements Safe Handling Practices Gas Characteristics and Typical Color Coding

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3/10/2012

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Purpose Hand Tools Power Tools Pneumatic Tools GMachine Shop Safety eneral Equipment Safety

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Rules and Regulations Preparations Daily Reports Heli deck Crew Duties Refueling Precautions Transportation of Goods and Baggage Hand Signals

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Extra Baggage/freight stowage area


If there is too much baggage in volume or weight to place in the tail boom baggage compartment it may be stowed in the right hand outward facing seat well. Ensure that the retsraint net is securely fastened and that no hard edged baggage is carried in this area.
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Baggage compartment
The normal baggage compartment is located in the tail boom just behind the PAS logo. It has a volume of 28 cu. Ft. and a maximum weight capacity of 400 lbs. with a deck load carrying limit of 100 lbs/sq. ft.
13 8

3/10/2012

The life rafts are normally stowed at this They may be removed by unbuckling the belt and then location. untying the inflation cord attached to the aircraft behind the
life rafts. Do not move the life rafts more than 15 feet without untying this cord or they could inflate.
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Passenger Emergency Exits


The windows may be opened by pushing hard at any corner!

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Passenger Doors
The operating handles are visible in the picture.

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Purpose Conditions of Transfer Transfer Equipment Procedure for Transfer

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Requirements Safety Inspections Construction Guidelines Use of Scaffolding Inspection Guide - Slung Scaffold Inspection Guide - Mobile Tower

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Purpose General Requirements Use of Ladders and Stepladders

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Purpose General Requirement Removal of Gratings

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Requirements Operation Inspection, Maintenance, and Certification Responsible Persons

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Rule Number One Dust Masks and Cartridge-Type Respirators Escape Units Air-Line Units Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus Proficiency Drills and Training Fit Testing in H2S Environments

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Purpose Rule Number One Characteristics of H2S Tolerance Levels Avoiding and Limiting Exposure Air Monitoring Emergency Procedures Pre-Planning

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Hazards Transportation and Storage Handling Explosives Radio Frequency Control

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Food Storage Food Preparation and Handling Cleaning and Sanitizing Food Utensils and Equipment Catering Crew Hygiene General Housekeeping Pest Control

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Hazards Symptoms Treatment General Requirements

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
3/10/2012 15 9

Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Work Practices Requirements for Grit/Shotblasting Requirements for Spray Painting

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
3/10/2012 16 0

Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Requirements Steam Cleaning Equipment Steam Cleaning Operations

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
3/10/2012 16 1

Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Hazards General Requirements High-Pressure Water Jetting Operations

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Requirements

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Material Safety Data Sheets Labeling General Requirements for Operator Spill Control Handling and Use Storage Requirements Transportation Requirements Asbestos
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
3/10/2012 16 4

Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Hazards Contingency Plans Notifications Registration and Records Requirements Storage Requirements General Requirements Third-Party Responsibilities

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Rig Hazardous Area Classifications Pressurized Equipment Hazardous Area Equipment

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Requirements Portable Gas Detectors Gas Detector Operation

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose General Requirements Lifeboats Inflatable Life Rafts Life Jackets Work Vests Immersion Suits Life Buoys Line-Throwing Apparatus Radio Lifesaving Appliances
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Documentation Requirements Marking Requirements Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance Requirements Table of Inspection and Testing Requirements for Lifting Devices Table of Inspection and Testing Requirement for Lifted Equipment Table of Inspection and Testing Requirement for Rigging
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Purpose Extension Cords Electrical Connectors Harsh Environmental Conditions

Electricity

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Purpose Driving of Vehicles Vehicle Specifications, Fittings and Equipment Vehicle Operation and Use Mobile or Cellular Telephones in Vehicles

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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3/10/2012

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General Equipment Safety

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Follow these general equipment safety rules:

Equipment installation and maintenance will only be performed by qualified personnel authorized to do the work in accordance with procedures. Maintain equipment in a safe condition at all times; unsafe equipment will be isolated and immobilized until repaired. Rotating and moving parts will be guarded from accidental or other contact by personnel. Immobilize equipment by means of electrical and mechanical isolation (refer to Permit to Work Manual before removing any guards or defeating safety devices including over speed trips, interlocks, and safety switches.
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Guard against rotating/moving parts such as spindles, chucks, belts, and gears that may trap loose articles and clothing, or drafts caused by fans or rapidly rotating mechanical components from drawing in loose clothing; sleeves must be secured at the cuff. Do not wear gloves when operating fixed rotating equipment. Take extreme care against fingers, hands, and feet becoming trapped or pinched by rotating pulleys, belts, or gears. Ensure that removed safety guards are reinstalled and adjusted before returning the equipment to service.
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

The following points apply to machine shop safety:

Machine shop equipment will only be operated by qualified personnel authorized to do the work in accordance with procedures and familiar with the particular PPE requirements for each machine. Use a chuck/cutter guard at all times. Remove chuck keys and vice handles when not being used. Do not remove or defeat mechanical stops or electrical cutouts (safety switches). Exceptions will be detailed on a work permit, reviewed and approved by the Maintenance Supervisor, and include additional safety precautions to be taken. Do not start or stop machines from the remote isolation switch; use only the machine on/off or start/stop switch.
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

primary method to communicate the hazards of any chemical or hazardous substance is a material safety data sheet (MSDS). Vendors, suppliers, and contractors will provide an MSDS to the Purchasing Department before delivering the material to a location. Unless appropriate data indicate otherwise, assume that all chemical materials are potentially harmful. Any substance arriving at the rig without an MSDS will be returned or quarantined until the MSDS is supplied. The MSDS system includes, but is not limited to, the following types of material:
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Drilling and service chemicals Paint and coating materials Solvents and thinners Laboratory chemicals Cleaning agents and detergents Lubricants, oils, and greases Adhesives Bleaches and other cleaning agents that catering personnel use on the rig Freon The information required from the MSDS includes the following: First aid Hazards Precautions

MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
3/10/2012 18 1

Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Drilling and service chemicals Paint and coating materials Solvents and thinners Laboratory chemicals Cleaning agents and detergents Lubricants, oils, and greases Adhesives Bleaches and other cleaning agents that catering personnel use on the rig Freon The information required from the MSDS includes the following: First aid Hazards Precautions

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Fire hazards and safeguards Storage Spillage and disposal Physical properties, including exposure limits, flash point, and boiling point Transportation details by type of carrier, including packaging and labeling, UN number, and classification of substances Vendor/Supplier contact to whom queries may be addressed
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

LABELING

All hazardous substances and their packaging/containers must be clearly labeled. The labeling of all such goods received must be checked by the maintenance supervisor and RSTR to ensure that the MSDS is available and the labeling information agrees with the MSDS. Labeling should provide the following information as a minimum: Name of product Signal word designating the degree of hazard: Danger, Warning, Caution Poison, with skull and crossbones for all chemicals defined as poisons as required by law Statement of hazards (e.g., extremely hazardous, flammable, and so on) Precautionary measures to take and actions to be avoid, such as Avoid breathing vapors, and Keep away from heat or open flame Instructions in case of contact or exposure (e.g., Immediately flush affected skin or eye with copious quantities of water for at least 15 minutes)

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Before any new chemical or potentially hazardous substance is brought to the rig by the Operator, it is to be subjected to a technical, safety, and medical review (HAZMAT assessment) by the QA/HSE department to assess the risk to personnel safety and health arising from its use or accidental exposures. Details of physiological, environmental, and fire hazards will be made available to all concerned with the storage and handling of harmful chemicals including use of appropriate protective equipment and necessary first aid facilities.
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

A full range of protective equipment for handling the hazardous chemicals and materials applicable to a particular job should be available at all times. Safety showers and eye wash stations should be provided in hazardous areas. They are to be kept in an operable condition at all times, and priority will be given to any repairs required. Adequate ventilation should be provided where toxic gases, vapors, dangerous fumes, or dust are likely to be found; exhaust appliances are provided as near as possible to the point of origin, where practical. The proper breathing apparatus must be provided when performing work involving the opening of a line, draining, or other operations where toxic gas or vapor may be encountered
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Follow these guidelines if a spill occurs: Wash areas of skin contact with running water and seek medical attention. Report the incident immediately to allow any corrective measures to be carried out quickly. Clean up the area without delay and cordon it off if necessary. Dilute with copious amounts of water and apply absorbent material. Dispose of the used absorbent in the same manner as the un spilled substance, or, if this not practical, use a neutralizing solution.
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

The following requirements apply to the handling and use of chemicals and hazardous substances: The PIC or a designee should ensure that personnel working with hazardous substances are aware of MSDS handling requirements. Always wear the protective clothing provided. Suitable first aid, spill control, and fire fighting equipment, in accordance with an MSDS, will be located near the area. Follow the instructions on the label. Do not mix chemicals unless you are absolutely sure that it is safe to do so.
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Avoid breathing vapors or fumes because they may be harmful; keep windward of escaping fumes. Post any area where toxic chemicals are being used with warning signs identifying the chemicals and their use. Warn personnel working in the immediate vicinity of operations involving hazardous chemicals of any possible risk of exposure. Do not siphon liquids by mouth. Post warning notices on either side of the discharge point when corrosive or dangerous materials (liquid or liquid gases) are being discharged or offloaded from supply vessels. Run the line contents to a suitable drain or container when lines containing corrosive chemicals are opened up; neutralization or water dilution may be necessary.
MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Keep a freshwater hose in the vicinity of the hazardous chemical operations. Add chemicals slowly to the water (not water to the chemical) when diluting the chemical with water that gives off heat. Always add caustic soda or acid to water and never the contrary. Never mix caustic soda into the mud through the hoppers. Handle chemical containers with care; neutralize any leakage quickly. Empty and dispose of damaged containers. Take care with bulk containers when removing plugs or covers for venting. Flush and neutralize pumps and lines used for handling chemicals after each use. Thoroughly wash out drums and containers, whether reusable or not, that have contained hazardous chemicals. Do not transfer chemicals into unmarked containers or to containers showing a label that does give an exact indication of the contents.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Safety equipment and workshop

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PURPOSE
The purpose is to provide information related to maintenance and use of lifesaving equipment on offshore facilities to maximize its availability and help ensure that it is safely deployed for drills and emergency use.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Follow these general requirements: All lifesaving equipment supplied must be in accordance with local regulatory and Safety Of Life At Sea (SOLAS) requirements. All rigs are equipped with the necessary lifesaving equipment, which is regularly inspected and maintained in a constant state of readiness. All inspection and maintenance performed on lifesaving equipment must be recorded. Protect lifesaving equipment against corrosion, dust, grease, oil, chemical attack, and other agents.
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

The following applies to lifeboats and their use: Launching instructions must be displayed near the lifeboat loading area and inside the lifeboat. When the lifeboat is in the stowed position, it must be in ready-to-go condition. Ensure safety pendants are attached when personnel are working on the lifeboat or winches and during rig abandonment drills. Do not use crew members for load testing under any circumstances; perform load testing with sack material or water bags only. Maintain lifeboats in a continuous state of readiness. Visually inspect them weekly and conduct a monthly checklist inspection. The lifeboat release mechanism must be of the on-load type. Every month, check all safety pins and other safety devices used to avoid accidental release of the boat when performing preventive maintenance for condition and correct positioning. Paint the release lever red and mark it DANGER LEVER DROPS BOAT.

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MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

The following applies to life rafts and their use: All life rafts must be installed in an elevated position so that they do not lie in pooled water and existing drain holes can perform correctly. Display launching instructions near the life raft station. All personnel must be familiar with the launching procedures. Installed inflatable life rafts are attached to the rig with a hydrostatic release and inflated automatically in case of vessel sinking. Manual release of the life raft does not require more than one person for operation; when the hydrostatic release cannot be manually operated, a quick-release device must be installed. Inflatable life rafts are serviced every 12 months by an approved servicing contractor.
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Mark the life raft container with: Rigs name Manufacturer name Serial number Number of people who can embark Length of the painter line Maximum permitted height of stowage above the waterline Validity date Maintain life rafts in a continuous state of readiness. Visually inspect them weekly and conduct a checklist inspection monthly.

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MSI-AAST&MT Copyright
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The following applies to life jackets and their use: Life jackets are available on each offshore rig. The number of life jackets is not less than 150% of the maximum allowable persons on board. Each life jacket is fitted with a whistle firmly secured by a cord, a light, and retro-reflective material. Stow life jackets inside each bedroom (one per bed) and stow spare units in closed and labeled containers located near the lifeboat stations. Post life jacket donning instructions in conspicuous places. Don life jackets properly and return them to their respective stowage places after use. Inspect life jackets at least once a year or more frequently if necessary.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

The following applies to work vests and their use: A sufficient number of work vests with reflective material must be provided on each offshore rig for the work being performed. Wear a work vest whenever working over the side, below the main deck, or anywhere a person could fall overboard. Adjust work vest size and securely fasten it. Return work vests to labeled stowage containers after use. Inspect work vests weekly
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

The following applies to immersion suits and their use: All rigs very in cold water areas must be equipped with enough immersion suits for at least 150% coverage of personnel. One suit is stowed at each bunk and the remainder properly stowed near the lifeboat At least two suits are designated for training purpose only; each person dons a training suit at least once a year and the persons name and date are documented. When immersion suits are on board, wear the life jackets during the abandonment drill and carry immersion suits. Do not remove the immersion suit from the bag during the drill; it will only be removed for emergencies and annual inspections station.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

The following applies to life buoys and their use: Each offshore rig has at least eight life buoys. At least four life buoys have a flashing wateroperated light, of which at least two have buoyant smoke signals.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

In addition, at least two life buoys are fitted with a buoyant lifeline of approximately 100 feet (30 meters), or twice the distance from the stowage location to the waterline, whichever is the greater. A life buoy must never be permanently tied or attached to the rig in any way so that it might be easily and quickly thrown over the side. If a person falls overboard, throw a life buoy near him/her, not at him/her; even if the person cannot reach it, it marks the approximate position and assists in rescue operations.
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Each offshore rig has provided at least one line-throwing apparatus.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

Two portable VHF units are available on the rig so that they can be placed quickly into any lifeboat or life raft.

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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

What do you check prior to using air winch? What is the maximum you can lift with air winch stamped with SWL: 5000kg? What is the breaking load for one sling stamped with SWL: 6T? What is the maximum load you can lift with one man-riding SWL: 500kg? If you have the choice between the working basket and the rigging belt to do a hard job in the mast, which one will you use? Why? Which color code is in use on the rig?
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Maritime Safety Institute MSI-AAST&MT

What weight can you lift with a 20mm diameter wire rope? What are you doing if you cant see the load hooked up on the air winch cable? Do you need a work permit to use man-riding winch? Which precautions do you take when lifting tubular from the deck? Personnel who can answer these questions correctly can be designated as an air winch operator and a distinguishing sticker can be posted on his or her hard hat.
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