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Department of Electronics &Communication Engineering Sri Sarada Institute of Science and Technology Coordinator: by: Presented

Ch.Venkateshwarlu G.Uday(08X81A0451) Asst.Prof. Dept. of ECE


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What is CNTFET ?
A carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

(CNTFET) refers to a field effect transistor that utilizes a single carbon tube instead of bulk silicon in the MOSFET structure. This CNTFET was demonstrated in the year 1998 by Ijima

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Why Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs)?


CNTs exhibit remarkable electronic and

mechanical characteristics due to:


Extraordinary strength of the carbon-carbon bond 2. The small atomic diameter of the carbon atom 3. The availability of free -electrons in the graphitic configuration
1.

And they also have some important

properties like

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Single dimensional 3d structure of cnts

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Fabrication of CNTFET
In the fabrication of CNTFETS we have many

methods ,some are 1. Back Gated CNTFETS 2. Top Gated CNTFETS

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1.Back Gated CNTFET


The earliest techniques for fabricating carbon

nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistors involved pre-patterning parallel strips of metal across a silicon dioxide substrate, and then depositing the CNTs on top in a random pattern.

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Top view Side View

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2.Top Gated CNTFETS


In this we have 4 steps to go. 1. single walled nanotubes are deposited. 2.They are located on the substrate using

scanning or by microscope. 3.Then, two metals are made in contact using electron beam 4.Then ,the top gate is kept on the top nanotube

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Complete structure of CNTFET


Source Drain

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Comparision

CNTFET & MOSFET


The CNTFET produces ~1500 A/m of the on-

current per unit width at a gate overdrive of 0.6 V while MOSFET produces ~500 A/m at the same gate voltage.

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Property
Size

Carbon Nanotubes
0.6-1.8 nm in diameter

Comparatively
Si wires at least 50nm thick

Strength

45 Billion Pascals

Steel alloys have 2 Billion P.

Resilience

Bent and damage

straightened

withoutMetals fracture when bent and restraightened

Conductivity

Estimated at 109 A/cm2

Cu wires burn at 106 A/cm2

Cost

$2500/gram Houston

by

BuckyUSA

inGold is $30/gram

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CNTFET as Memory Devices


The CNTFETS can be used as memory

elements In 3ways They are as follows,

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1.Method is Cui et al. employed CNTFET charge storage behavior to build a non-volatile memory The memory device is stable to hold the data over a period of at least 12 days in the ambient conditions

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2.

To avoid the probability of metallic CNT, Cui et al. used two methods:

Annealing (to heat at 335K for

different periods)
Controlled oxygen plasma

treatment at room temperature

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3. Lu et al. proposed a non-volatile flash memory device using:

CNTs as floating gates HfAlO as control/tunneling oxide

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Better Control over channel formation. Better Threshold Voltage. Better Sub threshold slope. High Mobility. High Current density. High Trans-conductance.

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Advantages of CNTFET as Memory Devices


Great potential for storage memory (116

Gb/cm2 ) Small size offers faster switching speeds (100GHz ) and low power Easy to fabricate standard semiconductor process Bi stability gives well defined on & off states Nonvolatile nature no need to refresh.. Have an almost unlimited life, resistant to radiation and magnetism better than hard drive.
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10. Disadvantages
1.Lifetime (degradation), 2.Reliability, 3.Difficulties in mass

production, 4. production cost


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conclusion
1. CNT is a future replacement for semiconductor based

microelectronics 2. The evolution of CNTFET is discussed 3. Employing CNTFET in a lot of applications such as:
Logic circuits Memories Sensors RF circuits

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1.Light 2.Bio 3.Gas


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REFERENCES
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Tans et al., Nature, vol. 393, pp. 49-52, 1998 Bach hold et al., Science, vol. 294, pp. 49-52, 2001 Wind et al., Physical Review Letters, vol. 91, no. 5, 2003 Yang et al., Applied Physical Letters, vol. 88, p. 113507, 2006 Derycke et al., Nano Letters, vol. 1, no. 9, pp. 453-456, 2001 Javey et al., Nano Letters, vol. 2, no. 9, pp. 929-932, 2002 Chen et al., Science, vol. 311, p. 1735, 2006

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Heinlein et al., Materials Science and Engineering: C, vol. 23, no. 8, pp. 663-669, 2003

Chen et al., Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 45, no. 4B, pp. 3680-3685, 2006 Na et al., Fullerenes, Nanotubes, and Carbon Nanostructures, vol. 14, pp. 141-149, 2006 Liang et al., Physica. E, low-dimensional systems and nanostructures, vol. 23, no. 1-2, pp. 232-236, 2004 Cui et al., Applied Physics Letters, vol. 81, no. 17, pp. 3260-3262, 2002 Lu et al., Applied Physics Letters, vol. 88, p. 113104, 2006 Seidel et al., Nano Letters, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 147-150, 2005 Cui et al., Nano Letters, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 117-120, 2002

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