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BARRIERS COMMUNICATION

FACTORS CAUSING BARRIERS:

Psychological
Individual linguistic

Physiological
Attitudinal

FACTORS CAUSING BARRIERS:

Psychological
Individual linguistic

Physiological Attitudinal

PSYCHOLOGICAL:
people's state of mind.
The use of difficult or inappropriate words in communication can prevent people from understanding the message.

LINGUISTIC:

PHYSIOLOGICAL:
may result from individuals' personal discomfort, caused, for example, by ill health, poor eye sight or hearing difficulties

ATTITUDINAL:
a result of problems with staff in an organisation.

Barriers to communication are things people say or do that are obstacles to good conversation or good interpersonal interaction These hindrances are more likely to be destructive when one or more persons who are interacting are under stress. They can lead to our dependency, withdrawal, feelings of defeat, or of inadequacy.

Twelve Ways Of Responding


1. ADVISING We give the other person a solution to their problems If I were you, I'd sure tell him off. "That's an easy one to solve. First ... "

DIAGNOSING:
We analyze why a person is behaving as he or she is. . Instead of listening to the substance of what a person is saying, some people play emotional detective." "I can read you like a book." "You are just doing that to irritate me."

DIVERTING:

We push the other's problems aside through distraction. We switch a conversation from the other person's concerns to our own topic

We divert sometimes because we are uncomfortable with the emotions stimulated by the conversation going on . "Don't dwell on it, Sarah. Let's talk about something more pleasant

Excessive-Inappropriate Questioning
Close-ended questions are often barriers in a relationship "When did it happen?" What did you do?" Answer; "Nothing."

Some questions can be conversation-stoppers. They can be incomplete, indirect, veiled, and impersonal How was school today?" Answer; "Ok"

LOGICAL ARGUMENT
We attempt to convince the other person with an appeal to facts or logic, usually without consideration of the emotional factors involved

CRITICIZING

CRITICIZING
a. We make a negative evaluation of the other person, for his or her actions, or attitudes. b. Many of us feel we need to be critical, or other people will never improve i.e., parents, teachers, bosses, coaches, etc...

CONTINUE.

E.g:You brought it on yourself. You've got nobody else to blame for the mess you are in.

NAME CALLING
Name calling and labeling usually have negative overtones to both the sender and receiver. Labeling prevents us from getting to know ourselves and other individuals: There is no longer a person before us, only a type

ORDERING

We command the other person to do what we want to have done. An order is a solution sent coercively and backed by force.

PRAISING EVALUATIVELY Do your homework right now We make a positive judgment of the other person, his or her actions, or attitudes, which may often have negative results

We try to stop the other person from feeling the negative emotions he or she is experiencing."

REASSURING
a. Reassurance is a way of seeming to comfort another person while actually doing the opposite. b. This barrier does not allow the comforter to really be with the other. It can be a form of withdrawal. "Don't worry, it is always darkest before the dawn."

THREATENING
We try to control the other's actions by warning of negative consequences that we will instig