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EVALUATION OF CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Types of Evaluation
Formative Evaluation

Summative Evaluation

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Types of Evaluation
Formative Evaluation
- used to determine the effectiveness of

the delivery of instruction that will serve as the basis for improvement - benchmarking for professional growth (Marczely, 2001)
CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Types of Evaluation
Summative Evaluation
used for making administrative decisions (promotion, hiring, merit pay, grant of tenure, reassignment, and even dismissal)
-

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Why Do We Need To Evaluate Classroom Instruction?

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Why Do We Need To Evaluate Classroom Instruction?


1. To help the instructional supervisor know how

to assist teachers in their work;


2. To assess the quality of instruction;

3. To monitor teachers progress in instruction;

and,
4. To serve as a basis for administrative decision-

making.
CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Dimensions of Effective Teaching


1. Hall (1998)

Knowledge and understanding of the subjects being


taught; Setting high expectations to challenge the learners;

Planning effectively;
Employing strategies that match not only the needs of the learner but also the curricular objectives; and,

Managing the learners well to avoid disciplinary


problems in the classroom.

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Dimensions of Effective Teaching


2. Moore (1998)

Reflective thinking
Decision-making

Planning
Communicating

Systematic Evaluation

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Dimensions of Effective Teaching


3. Eggen and Kauchak (2001)

Analyzing
Synthesizing Evaluating

Problem-solving

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

A CONTINUUM MODEL OF ART AND SCIENCE


Reyes, 2002

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

A CONTINUUM MODEL OF ART AND SCIENCE


1. Expert Teaching
o

2. Responsible Teaching
o

Subject matter
expertise Classroom

Learner-centered
teaching

Skills in developing students responsibility for learning

management
expertise
o

Instructional expertise

Skills in values integration

o
o

Diagnostic expertise
Rational expertise

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

A PYRAMIDAL MODEL OF TEACHING EXPERTISE IN PHILIPPINE HIGHER EDUCATION

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

CATEGORIES FOR EVALUATION


1. Content-related 2. Instruction-related 3. Climate-related 4. Classroom management-related

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
1. Communication skills 2. Knowledge of a variety of teaching strategies 3. Skills in planning and organizing

4. Mastery of subject matter


5. Skills in assessing the outcomes of learning

6. Skills in classroom management


7. Attitudes that foster learning
CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
1.

Communication skills communication plays an important role in instruction involves the use of verbal and non-verbal language to

Simonds (2001) argues that:


stimulate and maintain student interest, as well as facilitate


the teaching-learning process

establish a climate conducive to learning use to manage student behavior tool for mediating, negotiating, and resolving conflicts in the classroom

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
1.

Communication skills Callahan and Clark (1988) maintain that the use of questions is one of the most important teaching techniques. Thus, it is necessary for teachers to develop good questioning techniques as an essential communication tool. It enables the teacher to:

assess students progress


stimulates thinking emphasize key points motivates students to pay attention Christenbury (2000) said that one vital aspect of communication is listening.

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
2.

Knowledge of a variety of teaching strategies (Instructional Skills) of instructional strategies that lead the students to be involved actively in the learning process (Danielson and McGreal, 2000).

Instructional skills pertain to the ability of the teacher to use a repertoire

Instructional skills are demonstrated by competent teachers through:

the application of motivation and presentation strategies suited to


the topic and class level use of appropriate instructional materials selection of pacing of learning activities that sustains students interest ease in explaining difficult concepts by using simple terms the art of questioning

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
3. Skills in planning and organizing (planning) The organization of content, materials,

and methods of classroom instruction requires careful planning. 4. Mastery of subject matter (content) Teachers are expected to be expert on the subject matter being taught Teachers should be well-versed about the topic under discussion A common reminder to teachers is to make sure that s/he is not only one chapter ahead of the students but several books ahead, instead.
CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
4. Skills in assessing the outcomes of learning

(evaluation of learning) The teacher can use the evaluation results to determine whether the concepts and skills emphasized during instruction were understood or not. Evaluation results can be used as bases for improving instruction through further clarification, additional explanation, or sometimes re-teaching.
CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
5. Skills in classroom management (classroom

discipline) According to Kounin instructional management (California State University, Chico, 2005), classroom management includes all of the things a teacher does in pursuit of two important objectives: To foster student involvement and cooperation in all classroom activities To establish a productive working environment in the classroom
CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Teaching Competencies
6. Attitudes

(personality) Suggested attitudes and behaviors of the teachers that promote learning, and create proper climate in the classroom: High expectations Enthusiasm Concern for children Openness to student inquiry Fairness Humor Sensitivity to the needs and concerns of students Decisiveness

that

foster/promote

learning

CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)

Sources: Book: Bago, A. L. (2008). Supervision of Instruction (The Philippine Perspective). Quezon City: C & E Publishing, Inc. Website: Copia, J. S. (2011). Scribd, Inc. Retrieved July 11, 2012, from Scribd, Inc. Website: http://www.scribd.com/doc/60641943/CHAPTER-4-Evaluation-ofClassroom-Instruction-Joy
CATHERINE T. AANO (Presenter)