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Short Stories by Anton Chekhov, Volume 6: Ladies and Other Stories
Joy
Overdoing It
Серия аудиокниг30 книг

Chekhov Stories

Написано Anton Chekhov

Озвучено Max Bollinger и Alexander Kovalev

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Об этой серии

This volume of Chekhov stories includes: "A Trivial Incident", "Bad Weather", "The Chorus Girl", "Zinotchka", "A Gentleman Friend". Read in English, unabridged.


In "Zinotchka", Anton Chekhov tells the story of a young woman who is forced to marry a much older man. The story explores the theme of arranged marriage and the power dynamics between men and women. Chekhov uses symbolism and irony to highlight the characters' struggles with their relationships.


In "A Gentleman Friend", Chekhov tells the tale of a young man's infatuation with a married woman. The story is set in 19th-century Russia and explores the themes of love, obsession, and disappointment. The protagonist, Ivan, is a poor law student who falls in love with the beautiful and wealthy Elena. Elena is married to a older man who is unable to give her the attention she desires.

ЯзыкEnglish
ИздательInteractive Media Audio
Дата выпуска20 июн. 2019 г.
Short Stories by Anton Chekhov, Volume 6: Ladies and Other Stories
Joy
Overdoing It

Издания этой серии (36)

  • Overdoing It
    Overdoing It
    Overdoing It

    Smirnov is scared of being robbed. To compensate and deter the cabman from attacking him, he blusters on in a comical way about his fighting abilities, the three revolvers he doesn’t have, and how a party of armed friends will join him soon.

  • Short Stories by Anton Chekhov, Volume 6: Ladies and Other Stories
    Short Stories by Anton Chekhov, Volume 6: Ladies and Other Stories
    Short Stories by Anton Chekhov, Volume 6: Ladies and Other Stories

    Chekhov has always been huge inspiration for many great writers who came in contact with Chekhov's art. Thomas Man wrote that Chekhov's short stories attain to full epic stature and can even surpass in intensity the great towering novels. 'If I understood that better in later life than in my youth, this was largely owing to my growing intimacy with Chekhov’s art; for his short stories rank with all that is greatest and best in European literature.' he concluded . But what is it that makes Chekhov's stories so poignant, so striking and so inspiring? This volume offers some Chekhov's best stories, including: An Inadvertence, A Tripping Tongue, Boots, In An Hotel, Ladies. Read in English, unabridged.

  • Joy
    Joy
    Joy

    If anything happens it’s all known at once, nothing is hidden! It's incredible! You can't imagine! Look! My name has been published! Now all Russia knows of me!' A cautionary tale about people wanting and getting fame at any cost. Read in English, unabridged.

  • Who Was to Blame?
    Who Was to Blame?
    Who Was to Blame?

    Obviously he was born a mouse catcher, a worthy son of his bloodthirsty ancestors. Fate had destined him to be the terror of cellars, store-rooms and cornbins, and had it not been for education . . . Read in English, unabridged.

  • The Man In A Case
    The Man In A Case
    The Man In A Case

    Surely that needs no explanation… If the teacher rides a bicycle, what can you expect the pupils to do? You will have them walking on their heads next! Read in English, unabridged.

  • Ladies
    Ladies
    Ladies

    The importance of women and their influence can never be underestimated. This story vividly shows how in 19th century Russia women pull strings behind scenes to influence even the most principled and seemingly unbreakable of decision makers. And only Chekhov knows how to express such delicate matters in the most enjoyable and humorous way. Read in English, unabridged.

  • Misery
    Misery
    Misery

    The cabman Iona's son recently died. He desperately and unsuccessfully tries to have a talk with the people he meets and tell them of how shattered he is. He ends up talking to his horse.

  • Polinka
    Polinka
    Polinka

    Polinka, a thin fair little person whose mother is the head of a dressmaking establishment, is standing in the middle of the shop looking about for some one. Nikolay Timofeitch, a graceful dark young man, fashionably dressed, with frizzled hair and a big pin in his cravat, has already cleared a place on the counter and is craning forward, looking at Polinka with a smile. Read in English, unabridged.

  • About Love
    About Love
    About Love

    I understood that when you love you must either, in your reasonings about that love, start from what is highest, from what is more important than happiness or unhappiness, sin or virtue in their accepted meaning, or you must not reason at all.

  • A Tragic Actor
    A Tragic Actor
    A Tragic Actor

    Young impressionable Masha sees a tragic actor Fenogenov during his benefit night and falls madly in love with him. Masha decides to run away with the actor and marry him despite her father's clear disapproval. Her father disowns her describing her husband as idle, stupid, and of no fixed home or occupation. Masha later finds herself in desperate need of money and has to seek help from her farther. Read in English, unabridged.

  • A Tripping Tongue
    A Tripping Tongue
    A Tripping Tongue

    Natalya just returned from Yalta, Crimea and is telling her husband over dinner of all the charms of the Crimea. Her husband, delighted, gazed tenderly at her enthusiastic face, listened, and from time to time put in a question. Natalya's never-ceasing babble gets her into serious trouble however. She is eager to expose her friend Yulia of some indiscretion with a local guide and this leads to revelations of Natalya's own 'gay' times with one of the Tatar guides. Read in English, unabridged.

  • In An Hotel
    In An Hotel
    In An Hotel

    Madame Nashatyrin is fed up with violent behaviour and foul language emanating from abusive male guest next door. She has two grown up daughters and is concerned about their well being when complaining to the hotel-keeper. 'Either give me other apartments, or I shall leave your confounded hotel altogether! It's a sink of iniquity! Why don't you get rid of the scoundrel?' But as soon as the marital status of the scoundrel revealed she meditates and concludes that there's something good in everyone after all. 'Why, whatever he may be, we ought not to despise him. Perhaps your fate is here. Change your dresses anyway,' says Madame Nashatyrin to one of her daughters. Read in Enlgish, unabridged.

  • Oh! The Public
    Oh! The Public
    Oh! The Public

    Tickets please... A phrase familiar to every train passenger. And every now and then there's one without a ticket with a good excuse ready. When Podtyagin, a seasoned ticket collector on a train, decides to give up drinking and work honestly at his job it sounds like a good resolution. And this very day he comes across an 'unreasonable' passenger who finds the very word 'tickets' cruel and absurd. Read in English, unabridged.

  • An Inadvertence
    An Inadvertence
    An Inadvertence

    Strizhin, who normally leads a sober and regular life, comes home from a christening party where he had permitted himself to drink four glasses of vodka and a glass of wine, the taste of which suggested something midway between vinegar and castor oil. And of course spirituous liquors being like sea-water and glory: the more you imbibe of them the greater your thirst, Strizhin felt an overwhelming craving for another drink. He accidentally downed a glass of paraffin instead of vodka, and in desperate search for a doctor at 4 a.m. he found that a doctor is only readily found when he is not wanted. Read in English, unabridged.

  • Boots
    Boots
    Boots

    A piano tuner called Murkin, a close-shaven man with a yellow face, with a nose stained with snuff, and cotton-wool in his ears, came out of his hotel-room into the passage. And looking at his frightened face one might have supposed that the ceiling had fallen in on him or that he had just seen a ghost in his room. 'Upon my word, Semyon!' he cried, seeing the attendant running towards him. 'What is the meaning of it? I am a rheumatic, delicate man and you make me go barefoot! Why is it you don't give me my boots all this time? Where are they?' Read in English, unabridged.

  • Gooseberry
    Gooseberry
    Gooseberry

    Nikolai Ivanich has never reconciled himself to life in the city and makes plans to acquire enough money to buy a small estate where he can grow gooseberries, a symbol in his mind of happy life in the countryside. He saves every penny and spends his days dreaming of the future estate: where the main building will be located, ducks swimming in a pond, and where the gooseberry bushes will be planted. His brother sees it as an escape from reality and an unnecessary limitation. Read in English, unabridged.

  • In A Strange Land
    In A Strange Land
    In A Strange Land

    A native Frenchman no longer tutors the wealthy landlord's children as they've grown up and left the house. The Frenchman is now paid simply to be around, to be properly dressed, to smell of scent, and to listen to Kamyshev's babble, to eat and drink and sleep. It may sound like a dream job but there's always a catch. Read in English, unabridged.

  • Talent
    Talent
    Talent

    Yegor could not imagine his future works but he could see distinctly how the papers would talk of him, how the shops would sell his photographs, with what envy his friends would look after him.

  • The Helpmate
    The Helpmate
    The Helpmate

    It was past midnight. Nikolay Yevgrafitch knew his wife would not be home very soon, not till five o'clock at least. He did not trust her, and when she was long away he could not sleep, was worried, and at the same time he despised his wife, and her bed, and her looking-glass, and her boxes of sweets, and the hyacinths, and the lilies of the valley which were sent her every day by some one or other, and which diffused the sickly fragrance of a florist's shop all over the house. On such nights he became petty, ill-humoured, irritable, and he fancied now that it was very necessary for him to have the telegram he had received the day before from his brother, though it contained nothing but Christmas greetings.

  • Her Husband
    Her Husband
    Her Husband

    Natalya Bronin is lying in her bedroom, her whole being abandoned to repose. She lies, deliciously drowsy, thinking of her little daughter who lives somewhere far away with her grandmother or aunt. The child is more precious to her than the public, bouquets, notices in the papers, adorers and she would be glad to think about her till morning. She is happy, at peace, and all she longs for is not to be prevented from lying undisturbed, dozing and dreaming of her little girl. Read in English, unabridged.

  • Anyuta
    Anyuta
    Anyuta

    In the cheapest room of a big block of furnished apartments Stepan Klotchkov, a medical student in his third year, was walking to and fro, zealously conning his anatomy. In the window, covered by patterns of frost, sat Anyuta, a thin little brunette of five-and-twenty, very pale with mild grey eyes. Sitting with bent back she was busy embroidering with red thread the collar of a man's shirt. She was working against time... Read in English, unabridged.

  • Ivan Matveyitch
    Ivan Matveyitch
    Ivan Matveyitch

    Between five and six in the evening. A fairly well-known man of learning is sitting in his study nervously biting his nails. 'It's positively revolting,' he says, continually looking at his watch. 'It shows the utmost disrespect for another man's time and work. In England such a person would not earn a farthing, he would die of hunger. You wait a minute, when you do come . . . .' Read in English, unabridged.

  • The Looking Glass
    The Looking Glass
    The Looking Glass

    Nellie, a young and pretty girl, dreaming day and night of being married, gazes into a looking-glass. In the mirror her future husband emerges and they live together through days and months in fast forward, yet she sees her future distinctly in all its details.

  • The Fish
    The Fish
    The Fish

    On a hot summer day two carpenters, Gerasim and Lyubim, sit in a pond, floundering about in the water under a willow tree, beside the unfinished bathing shed they were supposed to be working on. Blue from cold and wrangling, they struggle to drag a large eelpout by the gills, from under the root. Read in Russian, unabridged.

  • The Huntsman
    The Huntsman
    The Huntsman

    Yegor the huntsman, walking down a country road accidentally meets his estranged wife Pelageya whom he's been married for twelve years but visited just several times, and even then, drunk and violent. She weeps and, fawning before him, implores him to visit her more often. He tries to explain why he, the best sportsman around, 'a pampered man', enjoying good tea and 'refined conversation', could not bear to live in a village.

  • A Malefactor
    A Malefactor
    A Malefactor

    A local investigating magistrate unsuccessfully tries to explain that it is wrong to take nuts off the railroad track to a peasant, Grigoryev, who simply cannot see why he's to be deprived of his right to use an iron nut as a weight for his fishing line.

  • A Malefactor
    A Malefactor
    A Malefactor

    A local investigating magistrate unsuccessfully tries to explain that it is wrong to take nuts off the railroad track to a peasant, Grigoryev, who simply cannot see why he's to be deprived of his right to use an iron nut as a weight for his fishing line.

  • The Fish
    The Fish
    The Fish

    On a hot summer day two carpenters, Gerasim and Lyubim, sit in a pond, floundering about in the water under a willow tree, beside the unfinished bathing shed they were supposed to be working on. Blue from cold and wrangling, they struggle to drag a large eel out by the gills, from under the root. Read in English, unabridged.

  • Grisha
    Grisha
    Grisha

    A boy of two years and eight months makes his first foray into the outside world in a company of his somewhat wayward nanny and is quite overwhelmed, having got even his first taste of alcohol. In the evening he cannot get to sleep. The soldiers with the brooms, the big cats, the horses, the bit of glass, the tray of oranges, the bright buttons, all gathered together, weigh on his brain. He tosses from side to side, babbles, and, at last, unable to endure his excitement, begins crying.

  • A Tragic Actor and Other Stories
    A Tragic Actor and Other Stories
    A Tragic Actor and Other Stories

    A collection of Short Stories by Anton Chekhov featuring "A Tragic Actor", "In A Strange Land", "Oh The Public", "The Looking Glass", "Her Husband", and "Overdoing It", read in English, unabridged. These stories are small masterpieces. The scene is set quickly and within a few sentences the story line is underway. But all seem to contain an element of the unexpected. In "A Tragic Actor", a man who believes he is destined for great things, but his life does not turn out as planned. The protagonist, Alexander Ivanovich Petrov, is a struggling actor who has never had much success. He spends his days working at a small theatre in a small town, and his nights drinking and dreaming of the day when he will finally make it big.

Автор

Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) was a Russian doctor, short-story writer, and playwright. Born in the port city of Taganrog, Chekhov was the third child of Pavel, a grocer and devout Christian, and Yevgeniya, a natural storyteller. His father, a violent and arrogant man, abused his wife and children and would serve as the inspiration for many of the writer’s most tyrannical and hypocritical characters. Chekhov studied at the Greek School in Taganrog, where he learned Ancient Greek. In 1876, his father’s debts forced the family to relocate to Moscow, where they lived in poverty while Anton remained in Taganrog to settle their finances and finish his studies. During this time, he worked odd jobs while reading extensively and composing his first written works. He joined his family in Moscow in 1879, pursuing a medical degree while writing short stories for entertainment and to support his parents and siblings. In 1876, after finishing his degree and contracting tuberculosis, he began writing for St. Petersburg’s Novoye Vremya, a popular paper which helped him to launch his literary career and gain financial independence. A friend and colleague of Leo Tolstoy, Maxim Gorky, and Ivan Bunin, Chekhov is remembered today for his skillful observations of everyday Russian life, his deeply psychological character studies, and his mastery of language and the rhythms of conversation.

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