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BR: From Green to Blue
Class 47s: From Inverness to Penzance, 1982–85
Cornish Railways
Серия электронных книг17 книг

Britain's Railways Series

Автор Craig Munday, Andy Flowers, Russell Saxton и

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Following on from Class 47s: Inverness to Penzance, 1982–85, this volume picks up the story and runs to the end of the summer 1986 timetable. It was a period of change, as the first 47s to be withdrawn started to fall by the wayside in the spring of 1986, since seriously damaged crash victims were no longer likely to be rebuilt. The first non-crash-damaged locos were withdrawn – sacrificed to provide a spares pool for the others. It was also a time of change with regard to how trains were heated, as steam heat became rare south of Hadrian’s Wall. Christmas 1985 was a watershed as the relief trains were now routinely electrically heated, with the latest ETH conversions emerging from Crewe Works from November 1985. In 1986, regular trips to Scotland were required to sample the delights of steam heat. Further changes came in summer 1986 as InterCity started to operate some routes in Kent, and Dover Western Docks was now on the map. With over 200 images, this volume provides a visual journey of the Class 47s in 1985–86.
ЯзыкEnglish
ИздательKey Publishing
Дата выпуска30 янв. 2022 г.
BR: From Green to Blue
Class 47s: From Inverness to Penzance, 1982–85
Cornish Railways

Издания этой серии (17)

  • Cornish Railways
    Cornish Railways
    Cornish Railways

    This book follows the railway through the changing landscapes of the county. It takes the reader from the rich farmland west of St Germans, through the unique Glynn Valley down to Bodmin Road and the freight abundant area of Lostwithiel and Par before reaching clay country on the way to the final destination of St Austell. In addition, also explored are the branch lines, which range from the rural line to Looe, the splendour of the River Fowey on the clay line to Carne Point and the varied and ever-popular Newquay branch. Lavishly illustrated with 180 full-color photographs, many set in glorious countryside, this book shows a variety of locomotives. Service trains dominate the images, though there are many charter trains featured, some with exotic traction for the far southwest. Taken from the short days of winter with piercing low sunlight, to the long days of high summer when the upside of the Cornish mainline is lit, allowing a different perspective, the photographs capture not just the trains, but the beautiful landscapes, rivers and coastline of the Duchy.

  • BR: From Green to Blue
    BR: From Green to Blue
    BR: From Green to Blue

    A fascinating, but much overlooked, era for the modern traction enthusiast is the changeover era from the old British Railways green and maroon to the corporate image Rail Blue of the new British Rail, which stretched from the mid-1960s to the very early 1980s. The attention of enthusiasts and rail publications of the era was focused on the dying of the steam age. This book aims to portray the many varied livery styles of the times worn by the locomotive, units, and coaching stock of BR. It illustrates every major change of the green to blue period, including many little known and surprising combinations, and aims to answer many questions that have puzzled enthusiasts since.

  • Class 47s: From Inverness to Penzance, 1982–85
    Class 47s: From Inverness to Penzance, 1982–85
    Class 47s: From Inverness to Penzance, 1982–85

    The Class 47 diesel locomotive was a mainstay of British Rail, with 512 built in the 1960s. As such, they were a daily sight throughout the UK, working express passenger and heavy freight trains as well as more mundane local passenger and wagon-load freight all over Britain. For rail enthusiasts, 'bashing' emerged as the art of trying to ride behind as many locos as possible. Largely due to their prolific numbers, the 47s were often disliked by bashers and the 47s were often given the disparaging nickname 'Duffs', but to those who followed them, they were 'Brush', an abbreviation of Brush Type 4, which was how BR originally referred to them. However, as time passed and other classes of locomotive fell by the wayside, a far greater appreciation of them is now the norm. This book records 1982 to 1985 and many days spent trying to travel behind all 507 of the Class 47s that were still in traffic at that time. There were triumphs and disasters in the course of these travels, but you got to go the length and breadth of the country and the book contains a wide variety of color photographs of Class 47s at work from Inverness to Penzance.

  • Western Class Locomotives: A Tribute
    Western Class Locomotives: A Tribute
    Western Class Locomotives: A Tribute

    Unusually for a large class of locomotives, all Western Class locomotives had the same prefix which gave them a unique identity. Redesignated as Class 52 in the early 1970s, they were essentially designed by and for the Western Region, which saw hydraulic transmission as the way forward in replacing the 4-6-0 steam locomotives that Swindon had produced. However, the rest of British Rail went down the road of electric transmission as the mistakes of the wholesale lunge into dieselization came to fruition, and when BR opted for a standard policy the Western Region was forced to comply. It was in 1967 that the death warrant for the hydraulics was signed, though it would take more than a decade to finally end the hydraulic era. Illustrated with full-color photographs of all 74 of the Western Class locomotives, on a variety of workings that illustrate their versatility, this nostalgic volume gives a portrait of a much-loved, but short-lived, class of locomotive.

  • Railways of Central Scotland: 2006–15
    Railways of Central Scotland: 2006–15
    Railways of Central Scotland: 2006–15

    The years between 2006 and 2015 saw many changes in Central Scotland’s railways with projects such as the rebuilding and reopening of the lines from Maryhill to Anniesland and the Larkhall branch, as well as the opening of the Stirling to Alloa and Kincardine line in 2008, followed by the Airdrie to Bathgate route in December 2010. Illustrated with over 150 color photographs, this volume looks at the transformation of the main route network in Central Scotland, over the ten-year period, detailing changing franchises, different liveries and new lines, locomotives and rolling stock.

  • Scotland's Railways: The Last 15 Years
    Scotland's Railways: The Last 15 Years
    Scotland's Railways: The Last 15 Years

    The last 15 years have seen many changes in Scotland’s rail network, including the replacement of old rolling stock, an explosion of colorful liveries, the opening of routes, the demise of coal trains and a boom in container freight traffic. Furthermore, electrification has changed a number of the lines beyond recognition. These changes have led to new electric units ousting the diesels and the introduction of HSTs on services between the Scottish cities. Illustrated with over 180 images, this book details the huge variety of trains, ranging from the everyday to the unusual, that have been seen on Scotland’s rails in the last 15 years.

  • Railways of the South East: Sussex and its Surrounds
    Railways of the South East: Sussex and its Surrounds
    Railways of the South East: Sussex and its Surrounds

    The first of two volumes covering the railways of the South East, this book focuses mainly on Sussex but also includes small sections of Surrey and Kent. It concentrates on locomotive-hauled traffic and details a wide range of trains including inter-regional passenger, parcels and mail, fuel, heavy freight, test trains, engineers traffic, Rail Head Treatment Trains, Snow and Ice Treatment Trains, railtour excursions and the luxurious Orient Express. An extensive range of different liveries, many now consigned to history on the main line, are shown. There is also a small selection of DEMUs in some of the areas they once operated. Over 180 color photographs, the vast majority of which have never been published before, serve to illustrate some of the wonderful countryside to be found in this corner of England as well as the trains that run through it. They are complemented by informative captions detailing not only the trains themselves but also some of the infrastructure and features found along the routes covered.

  • Diesels in East Yorkshire: Four Decades of Change
    Diesels in East Yorkshire: Four Decades of Change
    Diesels in East Yorkshire: Four Decades of Change

    This photographic journey illustrates East Yorkshire’s fascinating passenger and freight trains, railway infrastructure, stations and signalling over a 40-year period from the late 1970s. Local knowledge has enabled many unrepeatable workings or interesting visiting locomotives to be captured on film giving a comprehensive record of the many changes that have taken place in the railways of East Yorkshire. The over 180 color photographs, many of which have never been published before, illustrate rail services have grown or declined and the infrastructure of the railways has evolved over 40 years to meet the needs of the modern railway era.

  • British Multiple Units
    British Multiple Units
    British Multiple Units

    Multiple units are the unsung heroes of the modern railway system. Although they make up the main form of rolling stock for the majority of rail passenger services operated worldwide, particularly in high-density inner-city and urban traffic, they see much less media coverage than the more popular locomotive types. The many advantages of these units, as opposed to locomotive-hauled trains, include higher capacity, less track damage and lower operating costs, making them an ever more popular choice for modern, cost-conscious railway operators in Great Britain and around the world. Illustrated with more than 180 photographs, this book details the history of the major unit types that have operated on the UK’s rail network, beginning with the earliest Victorian-era steam railcars and the first late-Victorian experiments with electric-powered traction, and going right up to the modern hybrid-powered multiple units currently under development. The story is told through a selection of photographs, class details and tables listing the major unit types classified by propulsion method and generation.

  • Railways of the South East: Kent
    Railways of the South East: Kent
    Railways of the South East: Kent

    The second of two volumes covering the railways of the South East, this book focuses on Kent. It details a wide range of different trains including heavy aggregate, inter-regional passenger, test trains, the Orient Express, newspaper and mail trains, railtour excursions, engineers’ trains, weed killers and intermodal, steel, coal and nuclear flask traffic. An extensive range of locomotive classes in different liveries, many now consigned to history, are shown at work on main lines and branch lines in the ‘Garden of England’. Over 180 color photographs, the vast majority of which have never been published before, serve to illustrate the variety found in a corner of the country often regarded as a mainly multiple unit commuter carrying environment. The pictures are complemented by informative captions detailing each particular train and its working along with some of the infrastructure found along the routes covered.

  • Class 70s
    Class 70s
    Class 70s

    In the late 2000s, Freightliner was looking to expand its locomotive fleet towards more powerful and fuel-efficient locomotives that were compliant with the various European Union emission standards and rules. In a departure from the newest and most common locomotives running on the network at the time, Class 66s built by General Motors, Freightliner looked to General Electric to construct these new machines and opted to place an initial order for 20 locomotives with an option for a further ten. The new Class 70 was a 3,690bhp locomotive of a very different design from the Class 66s, with a focus on reliability and efficiency. Eventually, Freightliner declined to take up the option of the further ten locos and instead they were taken on by Colas Rail. Containing over 190 color photographs, this book is a collection of images showing every Class 70 locomotive, except the ill-fated 70012, over the last decade or so that they have been in service. It shows a variety of locations, mostly in the south of England, where these impressive locomotives can be seen at work.

  • Class 60s
    Class 60s
    Class 60s

    The Class 60 was the last truly British-built diesel locomotive design. From 1990, the locomotive was gradually delivered, with 100 in total going to the Railfreight sectors of Metal, Coal, Construction and Petroleum. Their introduction did not go smoothly, however, and they took almost three years to enter service due to various teething troubles. Once these were ironed out, the class became reasonably reliable, and examples of other classes that were getting very tired at the time were progressively withdrawn. Privatization saw all the class being sold on to English, Welsh & Scottish Railways and, in 2004, the first Class 60 was withdrawn. Towards the end of the 2000s, almost all of the locos were put into store with a seemingly very bleak future. However, in the early 2010s, a small fleet of the locos received a thorough rebuilding so they could haul DB Schenker’s heaviest trains, and eventually 21 locos were refurbished for them, another ten for Colas Rail and a further four for Devon & Cornwall Railways. This has meant that although the majority of the class is still presently rusting away and unlikely to run again, at least a number of examples will still be visible on the national network for a few more years to come. Illustrated with over 190 photographs, this volume looks at the Class 60s from their early days through to the end of the 2010s.

  • Devon's Railways: North and East of the County
    Devon's Railways: North and East of the County
    Devon's Railways: North and East of the County

    This, the first of two volumes covering the railways of Devon, follows the routes of the two main lines that enter the county from the east. Firstly, the former Western Region line is examined as it runs from Whiteball Tunnel in the Blackdown Hills and down along the attractive Culm and Exe Valleys to the county town of Exeter. It then takes the reader over the former Southern Region line from Axminster through rolling countryside to Exeter where the two routes meet. In addition, the book explores the branch lines that are still open in this part of the county; firstly, the one to Exmouth, which runs beside the Exe estuary for half of its length, and then by way of a contrast, the line to Barnstaple, which penetrates the rural heart of Devon to reach the county’s north coast. Finally, a look is taken at the Okehampton branch, which has just been acquired by Network Rail and is about to have its passenger service reinstated. Illustrated with over 180 color photographs, only a few of which have been published previously, this volume records many of the changes that have taken place over the last 35 years to both the infrastructure and trains. Coverage is mainly of service trains, but a number of special workings are also included. It depicts some of the older locomotive classes in their final days as well as the traction that provides today’s services.

  • Highland Railways: Four Decades of Diesel Traction North of Perth
    Highland Railways: Four Decades of Diesel Traction North of Perth
    Highland Railways: Four Decades of Diesel Traction North of Perth

    Set against a backdrop of the wonderful scenic beauty of Scotland’s Highlands, this book illustrates the area’s fascinating passenger and freight trains, railway infrastructure, stations and signalling over a 40-year period. Using photographs taken mainly by two railway enthusiasts who have made regular and frequent visits to the area, the reader is taken on a captivating photographic journey north from Perth to Inverness, Kyle of Lochalsh, Wick and Thurso. En route, many of the locations on the railway and the variety of locomotives and multiple units that have appeared in the area from 1979 to 2019 are shown. This volume includes over 180 historic photographs, most of which have never been published before, each accompanied by an extensive caption. Together they form a comprehensive historic record of the trains in Highland Scotland north of Perth, including some of the changes that have taken place in the railways of the area. They illustrate the growth and decline of passenger and freight services and how the infrastructure of the railways has evolved through a period of four decades to meet the needs of the modern railway era.

  • Norfolk Rail: 25 Years of the Wherry Lines
    Norfolk Rail: 25 Years of the Wherry Lines
    Norfolk Rail: 25 Years of the Wherry Lines

    Norfolk has enjoyed loco-hauled passenger trains for many years, with Great Yarmouth being a popular destination for summer holiday services from London, the Midlands, and the North. While these ‘summer Saturday’ services gained a significant following from enthusiasts and lineside photographers alike, they have not been the only workings to bring unusual traction to the area. The fleet of diesel units based at Norwich Crown Point depot has often been stretched, with augmentation required to cover services on the Norfolk and Suffolk branches, and for special events. A wide range of locomotives have been used over the years on local services to Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft. These culminated in the hugely popular Greater Anglia ‘short set’, featuring daily workings from DRS Class 37s. They finally ended in September 2019, with the arrival of a large fleet of new Stadler units, and disability regulations requiring the withdrawal of the outdated Mk2 coaches. With 180 color images, this title celebrates these workings from inception in summer 1994 to their finale 25 years later.

  • Liveries of the WR Diesel Hydraulics
    Liveries of the WR Diesel Hydraulics
    Liveries of the WR Diesel Hydraulics

    The WR diesel hydraulic locomotives have always exercised a special fascination for the modern traction enthusiast. One of the most interesting aspects of their history was the wide variety of different color schemes they appeared in over the comparatively short period they were in service, which encompassed almost every permutation of the old British Railways of the 1950s and 1960s, and post-1965 corporate image British Rail liveries. This book looks in detail at the liveries of these locomotives during the diesel hydraulic era from 1958 to 1977, illustrating every major and most minor variations. With over 150 images, it is an invaluable reference for the railway modeler and railway historians, and a feast of nostalgia for all fans of the glory days of diesel locomotives.

  • Class 47s: Inverness to Dover Western Docks, 1985–86
    Class 47s: Inverness to Dover Western Docks, 1985–86
    Class 47s: Inverness to Dover Western Docks, 1985–86

    Following on from Class 47s: Inverness to Penzance, 1982–85, this volume picks up the story and runs to the end of the summer 1986 timetable. It was a period of change, as the first 47s to be withdrawn started to fall by the wayside in the spring of 1986, since seriously damaged crash victims were no longer likely to be rebuilt. The first non-crash-damaged locos were withdrawn – sacrificed to provide a spares pool for the others. It was also a time of change with regard to how trains were heated, as steam heat became rare south of Hadrian’s Wall. Christmas 1985 was a watershed as the relief trains were now routinely electrically heated, with the latest ETH conversions emerging from Crewe Works from November 1985. In 1986, regular trips to Scotland were required to sample the delights of steam heat. Further changes came in summer 1986 as InterCity started to operate some routes in Kent, and Dover Western Docks was now on the map. With over 200 images, this volume provides a visual journey of the Class 47s in 1985–86.

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